Prince Charles Is Latest European Royal to Fall Ill With Coronavirus

LONDON — The blue-blooded are just as susceptible to the coronavirus as every other person on the planet, with Prince Charles the latest European royal to be diagnosed with COVID-19.
Clarence House said early Wednesday that Prince Charles, 71, had undergone tests by the National Health Service in Scotland, where the heir to the British throne and his wife Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, were already self-isolating at Balmoral.
The palace said it “was not possible to ascertain” from whom the prince caught the virus, “owing to the high number of engagements he carried out in his public role during recent weeks.”
He is said to be in good health otherwise, and went for the test after displaying mild symptoms of the virus over the weekend.
He is the second major royal to be infected: Last week Prince Albert of Monaco confirmed that he had contracted the virus.
Both he and Prince Charles had attended a WaterAid Climate Summit in London earlier this month, before quarantine and social distancing measures were enacted. Albert came down with coronavirus about a week later, according to media reports.
The WaterAid summit was attended by government representatives, community members and business leaders. A key focus of the event was to

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Hyke RTW Fall 2020

Cars could be seen passing by through the floor-to-ceiling windows, but inside the cavernous white-and-black space where Hyke staged its fall show there were only models and photographers. Like so many events, the show was canceled to audience members due to the outbreak of the coronavirus, but it was live-streamed on the brand’s web site.
Designers Yukiko Ode and Hideaki Yoshihara continued on their path of reinventing military classics and workwear with a modern touch, but their latest offering was in many ways softer and less structured than some recent seasons. Voluminous outerwear took centerstage, with elements of trenchcoats showing up on billowing ponchos and coat dresses with extra-long sleeves. Elegant separates such as ankle-length fringed skirts and crisp, high-neck blouses were sometimes accessorized with knit pinafore-like pieces with long fringe and high funnel necks. Some stopped at the chest while others extended to the knee.
Hyke is also known for its athleticwear collaborations, having previously worked with The North Face. This season saw a series of T-shirts, jackets and sneakers by Adidas mixed in with the more high fashion items. In other nods to functionality that still fell squarely in the fashion realm, the designers played with the idea of the

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Rosie Assoulin RTW Fall 2020

Coming off of her first official pre-fall season, Rosie Assoulin proposed fall as a response to the call of the prior collection. Where pre-fall’s strength was its lightness, fall’s was its focus on the colder season. The designer added modern twists to classics with heavy weighted plaid wools; for instance, enveloping opera coats and blanket-y ponchos or a coated cotton and tartan coat dress and high-waisted and belted trousers. Assoulin juxtaposed this tension with a variety of dramatic silk gazar, double duchess satin and silk file evening gowns; 3-D appliqué daisies, raw scalloped edges and a vibrant palette added the fashion whimsy the designer is known for.
WWD Critique: Rosie Assoulin offered divine tension within voluminous, couture-inspired shapes through heavy weighted wool outerwear and energetic eveningwear offerings for fall.

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Asian stock markets fall as COVID-19 is declared a pandemic

Asian stock markets fall as COVID-19 is declared a pandemicAmerican stock markets plunged on Wednesday, after the World Health Organization officially declared the spread of COVID-19 a pandemic. In Asia, meanwhile, almost all the major stock indexes were also trading lower the morning after the WHO’s announcement, with the Asia Dow Index down 4% by midday. Morning trading in East Asian markets was ongoing by the time President Donald Trump made an address in which he announced a 30-day travel ban from the European Union to the United States.



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Maticevski RTW Fall 2020

Sculptural and dramatic might be Toni Maticevski’s A-game, but he knows when to keep it clean. “As much as the ruffling is quite pretty and playful, I’m drawn to how much I can simplify a line while still keeping it interesting,” he said. Inspired by nature, his fall season read as the flip side to the cyber-glam of pre-fall, bringing an earthy palette of winter whites and pared-back shapes. Among the standouts were a dress with a fluted neckline, impeccable double-breasted jackets with kimono backs and ample blouses in devoré chiffon.
Where possible, he favored fully recyclable man-made fabrics, such as a buttery double-face Neoprene with a satin feel.
WWD Critique: When restrained, his volumes and folds looked more approachable, as cunning cuts designed to skim and flatter, rather than showpieces.

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Karl Lagerfeld RTW Fall 2020

As decisive as he was, Karl Lagerfeld rarely outright rejected design proposals, figuring a bad idea today could be a decent one a few years down the road. The brand’s fall collection reimagines many of his designs from the Nineties, and they look terrific now: power suits in pinstripes and strong-shouldered jackets with asymmetrical lapels; a bomber jacket with romantic sleeves that suddenly tighten, or a soigné cocktail dress in a graphic cocktail of satin and delicate lace.
The press notes cite a romp through France during Lagerfeld’s favorite period, the 18th century, plus England and Germany around the same time. But these geographies and eras were etched so gently — a corseted waist here, a velvet cape there — all that resonated was contemporary chic. Brocade tuxedos, a fit-and-flare leather dress and cool trenches — mostly in black — were on-brand and a big step up in sophistication, minus the vivid pink faux-fur hoodie.
Ditto for the leather goods, which are smart, varied and expensive-looking: the affordable luxury Karl always wanted for his namesake house, now growing at a brisk clip.
The brand still churns out cartoonish fare with Karl and Choupette depicted on T-shirts, socks, pouches and even umbrellas, but less

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Alexander McQueen RTW Fall 2020

By now, Sarah Burton could probably do a book about the traditional crafts of the British Isles. From the English Cluny lace on her wedding gown for Kate Middleton to the crinkled Irish “beetled” linen for spring 2020, she’s used her encyclopedic knowledge to create clothes with couture-like workmanship.
This season’s research took her to Wales, where she soaked up the romantic poetry of Dylan Thomas, Welsh national costumes, the healing power of the color red and the folk art traditions of graphic quilts and hand-carved love spoons.
All of it made its way into this sweetheart of a collection, full of high-low hems, blanket check layers, graphic tailoring and enough heraldic beading, pink quilting and red heart motifs to evoke Alice’s tempestuous queen. (Could another Disney fashion collaboration be in the works?)
Indeed, this was a another love letter to handcraft, no more so than the spectacular multicolored quilted coat with figurative motifs of dove, horse and panther. A similar design was stitched over 10 years from 1842 by master tailor James Williams, on display at the National Museum of Wales. Like his, Burton’s was made from salvaged materials — but from past McQueen collections. It was a beauty. (There was also

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Joseph RTW Fall 2020

Susana Clayton worked loose, masculine tailoring into a modern and sleekly feminine lineup, mostly in camel, gray and a range of ruddy browns. She threw in the season’s musts — shearling and fringes — with measure, adding a bit of argyle as well. The diamond shapes were elongated — molded to the Joseph aesthetic — appearing on a long sweater, a widely pleated skirt that fell mid-calf and a humongous, knit scarf.
WWD Critique: A year into the job, Clayton has proved to be a natural fit for Joseph, simplifying the brand message with uncluttered cuts and using layering to add depth.

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Yeezy RTW Fall 2020

Well, it wasn’t bourgeois.
It was brilliant. Kanye West’s stealthy takeover of Paris Fashion Week was brilliant in its last-minute buzz factor. Brilliant in its two-part punch, a religious event that prepared the way for the second coming, a quasi-religious fashion event. Brilliant in playing the kid card. (North West’s rap performance, adorable or irritating, depending upon where you stand on the grump-o-meter.) Brilliant in West’s iron-cast, I’m-a-star knowledge that — no matter the time (9:30 p.m.) or prior negative Yeezy experiences (Roosevelt Island) — if he built it, we would come.
We did, though a few opted out of Part One, the Sunday Service at the Bouffes du Nord theater. That proved to be a glorious 90 minutes of positivity that was, remarkably, at least to the uninitiated in the one-time congregation, not about Kanye at all. The choir leader referenced “Mr. West” once, a good 30 minutes into the concert, after which he did a brief solo. But for the most part, West faded into the 120 incredibly gifted singers of his Sunday Service choir, who lifted their voices in praise of a different Almighty.
Soon after the Sunday Service was confirmed, rumors started swirling about a show — Yeezy Season

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Xuly Bët RTW Fall 2020

Lamine Kouyaté was making sustainable fashion and championing diversity long before it became a thing. The cult Nineties designer, who originally hails from Mali, returned to the Paris runway after a 15-year hiatus — he had a three-year stint showing in New York — chose as the venue a charity shop, the shelves groaning with mismatched crockery and secondhand books.
Rossy de Palma and Michelle Elie, both fixtures at Xuly Bët back in the day, walked the runway. Kouyaté paraded a coed collection combining his signature body-con — patchworked together with red stitching, the wrap ballet cardigan a recurrent style — with denim, puffer jackets and upcycled check suiting splashed with block lettering in gold. Tailored pieces and crisp white shirts were styled under stretch cardigans, and boxy jean jackets with big metallic buttons.
It read like a celebration of eclectic street style — the kind not dominated by giant logos and broadcast on Instagram, but that people might wear on the street. “It’s about youth, about the future,” the designer said after the show.
Kouyaté may be largely unfamiliar to the younger set, but he already knows the ropes, and given the increased exposure of African designers and sustainable fashion in Paris

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Tre by Natalie Ratabesi RTW Fall 2020

Natalie Ratabesi drew on her personal style for fall, offering a lineup that mixed boyishness and elegance, relayed with loose jeans paired with suit jackets — cropped, double-breasted ones, extra wide and extra short. Her breed of coolness verges on rock-chic, but of an elevated sort, with distinctive play on volumes. Bulking up jeans in interesting ways, on the thighs, for example, she reined them in, too, with vertical seams in one case. Dresses were spaghetti-strap cocktail chic, in pinks and reds, with light, flowy skirts, sometimes pleated. Mini jumpsuits were charming, original and sexy — with comfy pockets.
WWD Critique: Stylish and original, the lineup conveyed cool-girl fashion without letting things get intimidating — a modern proposal.

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Gauchere RTW Fall 2020

With Brutalist architecture as her starting point, creative director Marie-Christine Statz sent out a collection dominated by structured silhouettes with cinched waists, wide shoulders and ample sleeves as their common denominator.
The gray, black and sand-toned color palette was a fitting canvas to highlight construction and set off the varied surface textures of the fabrics like rough wool, cady and grainy crêpe. These were enhanced with satin lapel detailing, adding interest to minimalist silhouettes that were slightly offset, as is her label’s wont, thanks to visible tucks.
Belts crossed the body on many of the tailored silhouettes, buttoned at an angle on a wide-leg jumpsuit to striking effect, while dresses that verged on the severe had subtle draping at the waist or capped sleeves, an outsized coat two sets of sleeves, all providing understated drama. Leather fringing created movement on a full-length skirt or as a toggle that hung down the back of a simple halter dress in charcoal gray.
The only ornament came by way of statement jewelry pieces created in collaboration with Samuel François, with giant gold brooches in the form of letters, bangles and outsized earrings punctuating certain looks.

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Mantù RTW Fall 2020

Playing with contrasts, Mantù juxtaposed a refined sartorial elegance with a touch of feminine, eccentric flamboyance. While double-breasted coats, sleeveless dresses worn with fluid blouses and skirt suits were crafted from classic tailoring fabrics, a chic pajama set, a cotton shirt tucked into a leopard print skirt and a coat cut in a hourglass silhouette were all peppered by a cascade of feathers.
WWD Critique: While respecting the brand’s main goal, offering modern women a practical yet chic round-the-clock wardrobe, this season Mantù succeeded in injecting a new, cool vibe into its fresh, approachable lineup.
 

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Maje RTW Fall 2020

Judith Milgrom pictured her imagined Maje girl dressed in sequins in the middle of an afternoon, either because she was getting ready to hit the town or had just returned home. So, for someone who likes to party, but also works, Milgrom thought up a dressy and easy lineup that felt youthful, with autumn-toned shorts suits, flattering floral dresses that stopped at the thighs, all-black bomber jackets covered in sequins and tweed vest and shorts ensembles. Adding a more masculine flavor, she also offered a hefty, shadow plaid workwear shirt, with lilac touches, and the season’s must, shearling — on the collar of an aviator jacket.
WWD Critique: Milgrom tackles her mandate of championing French girl style at home and abroad with consistency, offering another cute collection for fall that ticked off a number of the season’s bourgeois trends.

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Magda Butrym RTW Fall 2020

Magda Butrym never ceases to be inspired by the Eighties and for fall she kept her brand’s party spirit alive with plenty of mini-sequin numbers, pleated corsets featuring vintage-style floral patterns and chain embellishments or more standout body-hugging dresses with myriad ruffles embroidered on them.
By now, these are pieces that feel familiar yet still as exciting as ever — Butrym’s hip, Instagram-savvy clientele is not likely to tire of her statement occasionwear anytime soon.
But it was the new, more day-appropriate pieces that made for the more interesting part of the collection: There was plenty of tailoring, mannish coats with big shoulders, balloon-shaped pants and leather outerwear that had a retro feel and also highlighted the technical side to Butrym’s work.
WWD Critique: The Polish-based designer kept a fine balance between old and new that’s bound to sustain her success at retail.

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Chanel RTW Fall 2020

Who isn’t rooting for Virginie Viard at Chanel? So after her show on Tuesday morning, there’s no easy way to say it: Confusion reigned. Following a beautiful, deftly focused couture outing in January, for fall Viard sent out a confounding lineup that stunned in its disarray. The disorder started from the first look out. Make that a pair of looks, as two models walked together Armani-style, only without the sartorial connection that his duets typically share. One wore a light green skirt suit, the other, a sporty jacket over a lace cropped top and wide pants, a row of brass buttons unbuttoned up the side of each leg.
In her show notes, Viard referred to the pants as jodhpurs. They turned into a rare unifying theme. Others were a scalloped motif; folkloric, “seven-league” boots inspired by a pair Karl Lagerfeld owned, and a general sense of transition-in-progress to a sportswear sensibility. One can argue the merits of such a shift for Chanel, but not on the strength of this collection.
Overall, Viard seemed to embrace an anything-goes attitude. Literally, as some attractive suits and dresses got lost in a cacophony of random thoughts. Would-be Jolie Madame suits, only slit high in front.

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Louis Vuitton RTW Fall 2020

Walking into the courtyard of the Louvre museum after a season dominated by fears of the coronavirus, and yet another day of antigovernment protests that snarled traffic in Paris, you were struck by the impervious majesty of the place.
In its eight centuries of existence, the palace has seen its share of coronations and revolutions. Surely, this too shall pass?
The Louis Vuitton show venue was a simple black box with wooden flooring, and the guest list had been reduced by a third due to the coronavirus outbreak. The world’s biggest luxury brand was going sober, it appeared.
It turned out Nicolas Ghesquière has been thinking about history, too. As the show began, a screen lifted to reveal a vast podium filled with 200 characters dressed in costumes spanning five centuries — to the front and left, you could distinguish what appeared to be Britain’s Queen Elizabeth I.
It was a breathtaking tableau, worthy of a Hollywood production — the costumes designed by Milena Canonero, who worked with Sofia Coppola on “Marie Antoinette.” Yet rather than tap into France’s storied past, as he famously did with his spring 2018 collection of brocade frock coats, Ghesquière used it as a jumping off point for a

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Yves Salomon RTW Fall 2020

A new addition to the Yves Salomon silhouettes this season was the salmon-colored tags coming with each fur garment, printed with the company’s newly established “Resource Pact.”
“We’re committing ourselves as a company to drastically reducing the production of animal fur, focusing instead on reusing existing furs,” said the furrier, pointing out a black astrakhan coat that was made using leftover pelts. “Before each collection, it’s now mandatory for the whole team to sit down and think about how we can reuse what we already have so I can limit our purchases of new fur.”
The furrier has also repositioned the brand to include a bigger selection of sheepskin pieces, which now represents 50 percent of the collection, compared to around 20 percent five years ago. “A lot of wholesalers have become fur free, so we had to adapt our range in order to continue working with them,” Salomon said. The sheepskin pieces were treated in edgy ways: a cream sheepskin jacket was covered in a dark blue tie-dye motif, while a glossy nylon white puffer jacket had a removable sheepskin collar.
The chicest pieces of the collection were the leather silhouettes, a new focus for the brand: Boxy leather shirts and long

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Galvan London RTW Fall 2020

Galvan has built a thriving business based on its modern, fuss-free take on the evening dress, but now the label is starting to look at occasion dressing from many different angles and evolving its offer into a full ready-to-wear collection, complete with more separates and tailoring.
For fall, they looked at the bold colors and cosmic references in conceptual artist Julian Charrière’s work. They translated them into abstract prints splashed all over new, more laid-back wrap dresses; shiny lamé blouses with matching leggings that had a fun, disco feel, and striking georgette fabrics with metallic speckles that featured on shirts and gowns.
New versions of the label’s popular slipdresses, reworked in straight cuts to fit a wider range of body types, were another welcome addition.
“We wanted to show new aspects to the brand, but nothing is ever too fluffy. We always focus on timeless pieces that can make women feel good straight away,” said Anna-Christin Haas.
WWD Critique: Familiar shapes, including corseted jumpsuits and satin, body-hugging dresses, were still among the strongest contenders. But the new range of separates fit right in to the label’s glam universe and kept things fresh.

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Reese Cooper RTW Fall 2020

Still energized from his debut during the Paris men’s shows in January, Los Angeles-based Reese Cooper was back with a collection for women — a line developed on demand from female friends who liked his upscale, utilitarian-flavored streetwear but wanted more fitted shapes. He remade a vintage sportswear jacket with high-end wool fabric and added extra details: a hook here, an extra pocket there. Same for workwear trousers — slapping on extra pockets in places, for convenience and style. A snug translucent puffer jacket in a thermo-reactive material carried futuristic vibes, and he paired it with a long, bright blue skirt that added flow, while the drawstring waist kept things from getting too fancy.
WWD Critique: It’s early days, but Cooper’s star is clearly on the rise; here he offered another inventive exercise in elevating streetwear — his unpretentious breed of elegance feels relevant.

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Rahul Mishra RTW Fall 2020

Rahul Mishra prefers to call it “easy to wear” — his collection of embellished suits and dresses, some embroidered with floral and tropical forest scenes, others carrying fringes of tiny, hand-crocheted tree leaves. Even pale, sequined monochrome numbers were rich in detail. His vision celebrates hand craftsmanship with clothing made over dozens of hours, rather than the thousands it takes for his couture pieces. Sleeveless, tiered tent dresses in silk with sheer insets were also a carryover from the couture line, in solids, powder blue or daffodil yellow — more convincingly “easy.”
WWD Critique: Mishra is a strong champion for the slow-going, luxury route as an answer to the sustainability challenge, but given the difficulty of wearing artwork, the simpler options were most effective.

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Miu Miu RTW Fall 2020

Near the close of a fashion month that has felt like the world ending as we know it — between coronavirus anxiety and Tuesday’s pension fund protest sending armed police into the street, making parts of Paris resemble a war zone once again — Miuccia Prada gave us a moment of pure escape at Miu Miu.
Turning her show venue into a theater with plush patterned carpeting, red velvet seats and rose-tinted columns, she set the stage for a collection that was a reminder of “charm as positivity,” as she put it in her show notes, and really, the power of fashion to spark joy.
Not dressing to succeed, to impress or even to defy, dressing for oneself was what the collection was about, and how a spiky mary jane pump, jeweled hair pin or the unexpected pairing of a sailor top and a long, glossy black leather skirt, can make a day brighter. That’s why we all got into this crazy business, right?
Watching the beautiful parade of long, lean coats, some with high set rows of gold military buttons, and tiny velvet back bows adding childlike reverie, the ankle skimming skirts slit to the thigh with blazers cinched over top, and

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How to Watch Louis Vuitton’s Fall 2020 Fashion Show

Paris Fashion Week is almost over: the fall 2020 Louis Vuitton ready-to-wear women’s show is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. CET/12:30 p.m. EST at the Louvre Museum on Tuesday.
You’ll be able to see every new runway look from women’s artistic director Nicolas Ghesquière via the video player below ⁠— and can double-click on the player for a full-screen view.

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Lacoste RTW Fall 2020

For her third effort at the helm of the French sports label, Louise Trotter zeroed in on the relationship between René Lacoste and his wife, French golf champion Simone Thion de La Chaume. “They were both powerful people in their own right who came together and complemented each other. Their relationship, in their contrasts, was very harmonious,” she said after a coed show that blended the codes of golf and the brand’s tennis heritage.
She recast many of the brands signatures — track pant, trenchcoat and of course, the polo shirt that will come in a lusher double-knit version — in a palette of sophisticated bright colors, blowing out the proportions to telegraph ease in fit and in fabrics. “Today, luxury is comfort,” she said. “Performance can be how you feel, that you get a great fit, that you can wear it day after day and it still looks good.” Cutting much closer to the body, this more tailored but still relaxed silhouette felt in step with this season’s return to elegance while staying true to the brand’s sportier side. One russet colored suit, seen on a female and later male model, was striking.
Golfing touches were blended throughout, like the sleeveless

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By Fang RTW Fall 2020

One foot in the West, one foot in the East and her heart set on making a mark further afield is one way to describe Shanghai-based designer Fang Yang. After presenting her first couture in the French capital last summer, she showed her By Fang ready-to-wear line during the fall women’s wear collections, as part of a commercial push toward Europe — she has recently set up a studio in Paris — the Middle East and North America.
The designer took cues from the palette of often-overlooked Bauhaus textile artist Anni Albers and prettily spun origami — a longstanding inspiration — in the construction and decoration of a lineup of smart daywear pieces. For example, on a classic blazer, geometric inserts created curves that hugged the waist, while the placket of a shirt was folded into intricate triangles. But she also strayed away from formal folds with success, leaving fabric to drape naturally. It turned a parka into a cape-analogue, one of the more memorable pieces.
Already sold in retailers such as Beams in Japan and at some 40 doors in China, including its own French Concession flagship store, the line retails for between 400 euros for a crisp poplin blouse with

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Kirin Peggy Gou RTW Fall 2020

A quick scroll through Peggy Gou’s Instagram makes it clear the techno DJ and producer is never happier than when wearing an oversize sweatshirt. But for fall, she’s taking her Kirin Peggy Gou collection in a more upscale direction, with tailored pieces featuring geometric patterns inspired by dancheong, the painted motifs found on traditional Korean buildings.
Though based in Berlin and more often than not racking up air miles, Gou has made Korean references a signature of her collection, now in its third season. Her stylized version of dancheong appeared as a jacquard motif on a viscose shirt, a patchwork pattern on a quilted jacket or a digital print on jeans.
While pajamas remain a staple of the brand, she also offered a more sophisticated take on loungewear, via habotai silk robes with colorful geometric motifs. At the other end of the spectrum were playful fake furs in primary color block designs, used for plush jackets, a bucket hat and an oversize fanny pack.
While Gou likes to switch themes every season — “I have too many ideas for the next time” — she hopes to establish enough brand signatures to expand the label. “I’m looking to do some collaborations, maybe when the

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Nanushka RTW Fall 2020

Sandra Sandor has nailed a formula that works for her buzzy contemporary label and wants to stick to her niche. That’s why for fall 2020 she continued serving leather separates galore, some of which are also offered in vegan leather, easygoing satin dresses and statement outerwear.
She kept the collection feeling fresh by looking at her signatures “in a different context.” Inspired by the tension between grunge and bourgeois aesthetics, she added a bigger dose of tailoring pieces, some cut closer to the body than her usual silhouettes. She mixed them with grungier pleated leather separates, frayed hems or oversize outerwear.
Sandor is also furthering her sustainability commitments by using more organic and recycled fabrics, as in a chic linen trenchcoat or tweed and leather cape featuring recycled polyester.
The oversize ruched leather bags, stacked gold cuffs and chain necklaces — part of an exciting collaboration with label-of-the-moment Alighieri — elevated the look further.
WWD Critique: Sandor did well by building on her signature look, which continues to feel up-to-date with women’s needs for photogenic yet fuss-free clothing.

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Akris RTW Fall 2020

Drawing in his silhouettes for fall, Albert Kriemler churned out a sensual lineup with an arty veneer but also made room for softness, thanks to a healthy helping of velvet, cashmere and shearling.
The designer was in high spirits ahead of the show. It’s not just that he was excited to present the clothing — and the remarkable luxury fabrics he conjured up for his audience this season — he was also pleased about landing the show venue: the Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris. It was no small feat, and an initial deal for a space on the upper floor was scuppered by another exhibit.
“I said, ‘Listen, there is so much connection to what’s hanging in your collection and my inspiration that we should reevaluate,’” he recalled.
Art-obsessed Kriemler had trained his focus on Robert Mallet-Stevens and other artists of his French Union of Modern Artists. Borrowing Cubist and graphic elements from the architect, Kriemler applied them to an all-black jumpsuit and jacket ensemble made of intricate St. Gallen embroidery — trim on top, loose and airy on the bottom. Thicker options carried blocks of autumnal tones, applied on a wool bouclé tweed and offered in layers, with tunics, skirts, capes and

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Shiatzy Chen RTW Fall 2020

“All the world’s a stage, And all the men and women merely players,” wrote William Shakespeare, but Wang Chen Tsai-Hsia’s collection negated the idea of the Shiatzy Chen customer being only a bit player. The designer said she’d drawn inspiration from Eastern and Western theater, focusing on the larger than life wardrobe of its actors, on- and off-stage.
Presented in one-to-one appointments, rather than a show, the brand’s labor-intensive craftsmanship shone. In pictures or see at catwalk speeds, the overall impression would have been of a lineup that taps the Western feminine mid-century tropes seen elsewhere this season. In person, a host of details jumped out. The way different types of lace were layered to achieve a 3-D effect on a shoulder. A double collar took cues from a traditional Chinese one and was layered in a trompe-l’oeil combination with a necklace neckline. It wasn’t all perfect: a couple of jacquards — a jumbled pattern of stages, operatic headdresses, fans and flowers — stumbled, particularly as stately gowns.
The more attractive silhouettes were no doubt the ones balancing extensive handiwork and traditional Chinese cuts with contemporary fits and lengths. Among the standouts were a great coat cut from a padded material that

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Schiaparelli RTW Fall 2020

Since his ready-to-wear debut for Schiaparelli last season, Daniel Roseberry has been house cleaning.
To begin with, he gave the French maison’s salons on Place Vendôme a small facelift, filling the soaring rooms with modernist furniture from the Thirties and Forties — both as a nod to founder Elsa Schiaparelli, and as a taster for the Schiaparelli shop-in-shop that will open at Bergdorf Goodman in June.
He’s also tidied up the collection, which is looking a lot more New York-friendly. Out with the Technicolor sunset embroidery, in with navy and black, the better to set off gold jewelry buttons and keyhole details. “All of the wardrobe staples are here,” said Roseberry, rifling through racks of white shirts, slouchy suits and LBDs.
That’s not to say the clothes are basic. Everything is informed by the haute couture line shown in January: For instance, there’s a version of the blue leopard print jacket recently worn by Cate Blanchett, minus the bugle beads.
The Surrealist jewelry unveiled on the runway has been developed into a full accessories collection, and also inspired the print on a cool black blouse and pants. Other items range from sporty — think a navy bomber jacket with a quilted skeleton motif —

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Alaïa RTW Fall 2020

Time was important to Azzedine Alaïa. He rejected the forced march of fashion’s calendars, famously saying that he’d show when he was ready, and had long conversations with friends on the subjects (a selection of these have been collected in a book, “Taking Time,” to be published by Rizzoli on March 31).
But eventually, time ran out, leaving designs unfinished. One form-fitting fringed jacket finally found its way into this fall’s collection. “I kept seeing it and would ask him time and again. He always said ‘leave it for the next collection’,” recalled studio director Caroline Fabre Bazin. Ten seasons after it fell to his trusted team to continue his work, one thing is certain: Monsieur Alaïa was a couturier who’d had ideas to last several lifetimes.
Among the standouts of the season: a coatdress that featured individual knife pleats that had been individually cut and sewn flat; corsets in various guises, from fringed leather to full-length mermaid jersey skirts; floor-skimming velvet dresses in jewel tones; sunflower prints that continued the nod to Cristòbal Balenciaga; a long sheath with a spiraling metal trim that nodded to his iconic zip-around dress; a gown made of a leopard print jersey bodysuit that flowed into

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Top prospect Okudah returns to workout after fall

The Ohio State corner jumped for a pass during position drills and hit his head on the turf when he landed. He said he had some neck soreness but returned to take part in the vertical and broad jump drills.
www.espn.com – NFL

Deveaux RTW Fall 2020

Tommy Ton has made a name for himself with his upbeat New York runway shows for Deveaux. His Paris debut was an altogether quieter affair, and not just because the coronavirus has cast a pall over Paris Fashion Week.
The photographer, best known for his street style coverage, opted to show his fall collection in an apartment on tony Avenue George V to give editors an opportunity to see the outfits up close. He chose a cast of mature models, including Suzi de Givenchy, who milled around looking aspirationally elegant.
“I love working with models that have so much character, and these are the people that I chase after in the streets, so it’s kind of weird that I’m playing puppeteer in a way,” Ton said with a smile.
There was a strong focus on outerwear, with items like an oversize quilted coat vest, worn over a felty sweater and skirt; a crisp buttoned-up jacket, and a flecked gray shawl cape. Deveaux specializes in timeless staples that are made in America, though as the brand grows, Ton is considering moving some production overseas.
For style inspiration, he’ll keep looking to Paris.
“I just think the way that a French woman puts together her wardrobe, or

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Thom Browne RTW Fall 2020

If the rising waters at Balenciaga left one with a sense of doom and gloom, along came Thom Browne’s ark to save the day with childlike reverie.
Here’s the setup: Showing men’s and women’s on the runway together for the first time, the designer put the sexes on equal footing — literally — in sensible, block heel Ghillie boots. It was a good move.
Gone were women in dizzying platform shoes having to be escorted off the runway after feeling faint. Gone, too, were the hobble skirts and bound arms that have on occasion, suggested a misogynistic blind spot. Instead, strolling the runway wonderland of snow, were matched his-and-her model sets, dressed identically to tailored perfection in skirts, dresses and suits.
But, since they all wore black veils over their faces (fastened with tiny hair pins, each painstakingly affixed with a signature Thom Browne red, white and blue ribbon), it was difficult to tell which was which, and that was the point. Thanks to Janelle Monáe (sitting front row), Billy Porter, Laverne Cox and many more trailblazers, it doesn’t really matter anymore.
Playing to the storyline, each model carried a different animal-shaped leather handbag. There were 33 in total in Browne’s zootopia — giraffes,

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Equipment RTW Fall 2020

Equipment’s vision of nonchalant French elegance ran from utilitarian silhouettes to understated nods to a rock ’n’ roll aesthetic. Solutions for head-to-dressing included an expanded knit offer and print dresses intended to subtly evoke the Paris skyline. There was also the reintroduction of sleepwear with pajamas that would work as day-to-night dressing, a limited-edition line of shirts reproduced from the archives, and a more colorful proposition in the second season for Equipment’s gender-fluid line.
WWD Critique: The pared-back aesthetic that underlies Equipment’s DNA provided a range of silhouettes that were classic enough to take from one season to the next while providing subtle details to pique interest.

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Noir Kei Ninomiya RTW Fall 2020

The main story at Noir Kei Ninomiya was hard to miss: The show opened with a blood-red look. Asked what that passionate hue, which dominated the lineup, meant, the Japanese designer explained that he’d been interested in gradations of red and how mixing them together resulted in black. But he wouldn’t be drawn into a discussion on his feelings. “I put everything in my collection,” he said. Underneath, he’d threaded, snapped, wound, clipped, tufted, frayed but certainly not sewed his way through the season as per usual.
But black — what he says he’s really interested in — was hiding everywhere. It appeared in the innermost folds of the packed red flurries that formed his body cocoons. It formed when transparent burgundy PVC leaves were layered. It came through on the edges of metallic puffball skirts, even through the surface of the fabric was both red and metallic.
That’s not to say there was nothing new this season. The tartan itself was new, and so was the Noir take on knitwear, which meant safety pins were threaded into each other to form a geometric “knit” dress, or a Rapunzel-like harness made of a braid of flaxen “hair” which turned out to be

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Honayda RTW Fall 2020

Honayda Serafi is always looking for the next woman to inspire her — her mother, people she encounters in outreach programs, those in history. “That’s how you empower, it goes from one generation to the next,” she said. This fall, she had Queen Dihya, a Berber ruler who led a resistance in early 7th-century Maghreb, on her mind. But the lineup was more majestic than martial, chockablock with statuesque, leg-baring evening columns, power jumpsuits and sharply cut tailored separates in a palette of rich purple and golden yellow. Embroidered patterns and a graphic scattering of geometric forms were inspired by traditional Amazighi patterns. Of note: Serafi opted to exclude materials of animal origin. Even the silk was artificial.
WWD Critique: While there were plenty of glamorous outfits that’ll please her red-carpet clientele, it’s her takes on traditional garments of her homeland of Saudi Arabia — kaftan jumpsuit, anyone? — that make her work stand out.

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Hermès RTW Fall 2020

If ever there were a season when it would have been easy for Hermès to trot out its heritage full gallop, it would be this one, when everyone from Michael Kors to Balmain’s Olivier Rousteing are feeling horsey, and turning out bourgeois tailoring, blanket coats and capes.
But the house has always set its own pace apart from the whims of seasonal trends. So instead, Nadège Vanhee-Cybulski decided to pare the women’s wear back to a graphic essence. In keeping with the Hermès 2020 theme, “Innovation in the Making,” she presented a “manifest of purity,” as she called it, on a set of striped vertical bars reminiscent of horse jump poles.
Working in Piet Mondrian’s strict vocabulary of primary colors, she created a baseline for an Hermès wardrobe, including more options in non-leather or using minimal-leather (with the growing animal-loving luxury class in mind, perhaps?). Some looks came in both, well positioning the brand for changing values around consumption, and offering more accessible pieces as it courts customers with new product categories, including its first line of lipsticks bowing March 4.
Canvas raincoats with cape collars, contrast quilting and shearling lapels struck a preppy note, as did silk skirts with linear pattern play

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'Quiplash 3' is coming to Jackbox's Party Pack 7 this fall

'Quiplash 3' is coming to Jackbox's Party Pack 7 this fallThe holiday season may be over, but that doesn't mean the parties (and party games) have to stop. Jackbox Games unveiled this week that the seventh generation of its annually released Party Packs will arrive this fall. Today, the company released a trailer for Quiplash 3 at Pax East, and announced that the new game will be one of the titles in Party Pack 7.



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Anton Belinskiy RTW Fall 2020

Anton Belinskiy wanted to celebrate the “normal” person on the street with his fall collection — and proved his point by parading his models under the drizzle in a down-at-the-heel pedestrian thoroughfare in the Paris suburb of Clichy. The Ukrainian designer’s creations, made from deadstock and upcycled fabrics, channeled a thrift shop vibe that was a perfect fit with the setting. His pastel “party” dresses with an Eighties feel had mismatched sleeves, and mingled with more grungy, streetwear references like red and black check dungarees, fake fur and colorful mesh knits made from vintage denim yarn. Offbeat tailoring — some of it padded — and print pieces featuring photos by young Ukrainian artists completed the lineup.
WWD Critique: Never mind outsider art, it seems like outsider fashion is now a thing. Anton Belinskiy’s collection was off the beaten track in more ways than one. Then again, that was probably the point.

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Redemption RTW Fall 2020

Redemption’s Gabriele “Bebe” Moratti changed the score for fall, setting his collection to an opera soundtrack inspired by “Madame Butterfly.” Asian influences — cue cherry blossom prints, kimono shapes and flowing bell sleeves — were evident in the glamorous-as-ever lineup. These were contrasted with statement tailoring for a night out — at the opera — and outerwear pieces, including striking check tuxedos glittering with transparent sequins and velvets galore in rich hues of red and purple. The lineup included the label’s first men’s wear pieces, tying in with the theme.
WWD Critique: A darker, almost melancholic register becomes Redemption well. While there was still plenty of the label’s signature glitz to be had, the deep color palette and opulent fabrics hit the right note.

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Nina Ricci RTW Fall 2020

The Nina Ricci girl has arrived on dry land. For their fall collection, Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh ditched the aquatic references they had made something of a brand signature and took to the city streets, with a collection that mixed mannish tailoring with touches of boudoir slink.
“This season it was very important for us to create this more grounded woman,” Herrebrugh said backstage, adding the pair based their color palette on the work of Dutch painters who moved to Paris.
Shots of saffron, ultramarine and Sienna red brought to mind Old Masters, but the duo also looked to 20th-century artists like Kees van Dongen, approaching each look like an individual portrait.
One woman might opt for the comfort of men’s staples: a gray wool overcoat, dress shirt and beige pants pooling over sturdy shoes. Another might succumb to the seduction of a black silk pajama set and robe. Boxy cropped jackets were layered over gauzy shirts, while snug mohair sweaters set off extra-large pleated pants.
Whereas the designers previously pushed the Ricci atelier with their sculptural flou constructions, this show saw them exhale. A case in point: the billowing cinnamon dress that brought to mind a painter’s smock.
But their true mastery lay

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Nina Ricci RTW Fall 2020

The Nina Ricci girl has arrived on dry land. For their fall collection, Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh ditched the aquatic references they had made something of a brand signature and took to the city streets, with a collection that mixed mannish tailoring with touches of boudoir slink.
“This season it was very important for us to create this more grounded woman,” Herrebrugh said backstage, adding the pair based their color palette on the work of Dutch painters who moved to Paris.
Shots of saffron, ultramarine and Sienna red brought to mind Old Masters, but the duo also looked to 20th-century artists like Kees van Dongen, approaching each look like an individual portrait.
One woman might opt for the comfort of men’s staples: a gray wool overcoat, dress shirt and beige pants pooling over sturdy shoes. Another might succumb to the seduction of a black silk pajama set and robe. Boxy cropped jackets were layered over gauzy shirts, while snug mohair sweaters set off extra-large pleated pants.
Whereas the designers previously pushed the Ricci atelier with their sculptural flou constructions, this show saw them exhale. A case in point: the billowing cinnamon dress that brought to mind a painter’s smock.
But their true mastery lay

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Mulberry RTW Fall 2020

Johnny Coca has found a winning formula for Mulberry’s ready-to-wear collections: It’s all about keeping it simple and focused on all things British.
That’s why for fall 2020 he wanted to revisit and refine some of the codes he established last season, namely check. He reworked the pattern into feminine silhouettes such as slim tailoring, midi skirts and chic, A-line dresses that featured muted hues, reminiscent of the English countryside.
Elsewhere, Coca added splashes of red check to channel a more punk feeling — his ultimate aim being to establish the check as a monogram of sorts for Mulberry.
There was a small eveningwear portion, too, featuring even more British classics in the form of floral and brocade shift dresses and tops.
But the main focus was on offering a daywear wardrobe, including plenty of outerwear, from cool check trenches to capes and pea coats featuring subtle military details.
“There are so many brands out there, so for us it’s all about trying to be clever and offering the right pieces that you need in your wardrobe and can relate to our accessories, too,” said Coca, whose focused approach is refreshing in a saturated market and aligns with the company’s sustainability ambitions.
He applied the same thinking

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Fall in Love With Spring 2020’s Romantic Silhouettes Trend

EComm: Spring Trend Romantic SilhouettesWe love these products, and we hope you do too. E! has affiliate relationships, so we may get a small share of the revenue from your purchases. Items are sold by the retailer, not E!.
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Leonard Paris RTW Fall 2020

Christine Phung set out to update bourgeois basics by applying a sporty veneer. She mixed up the silky house classics with technical Neoprene fabric coats, chunky wool tweed pencil skirts and capes, a smattering of embroidered leather flower patches and, for shine, shimmery jacquards.
Drilling down on the archives — prints are the very essence of the brand — she left them intact but still found space to do her stuff, zeroing in on blank spaces, which she used to add asymmetry and contrast. In one look, a silk blouse carried the signature house orchid print on one side, but was solid on the other — with a pocket. Paired with handsome high-waisted trousers, slightly flared, Seventies-style, it made for a handsome retro-update.
Some looks verged on weird. Shimmery see-through taffeta felt modern as a Windbreaker, but a bit out-there when fashioned into puffy sleeves on an ankle-skimming dress, while the proportions on a trim, collarless jacket with rounded shoulders felt slightly odd.
Mostly, though, it was pretty cool, with a good deal of inventive layering. A printed silk kimono, tossed over a trim yellow puffer coat, why not? All set, with leopard-printed trousers.
Also, Phung drew up a new pattern — rooster tail

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Fall in Love With Spring 2020’s Romantic Silhouettes Trend

EComm: Spring Trend Romantic SilhouettesWe love these products, and we hope you do too. E! has affiliate relationships, so we may get a small share of the revenue from your purchases. Items are sold by the retailer, not E!.
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Paco Rabanne RTW Fall 2020

She-popes, knights in shining chain mail fringe and Joan of Arc gone grunge. These were the magical creatures Julien Dossena conjured with his fall Paco Rabanne collection, a ceremony of powerful chic at the storied Conciergerie.
Steeped in historicism but with modern cool, it was celebration of radical craft, contrasting lightness and darkness, austerity and ornamentation, and taking inspiration (like several other collections this season), from religious vestments, but filtered through a very Paco lens.
Harnessing some impressive workmanship, Dossena mastered all the elements, from military-influenced glossy leather tailoring to ethereal chiffon volume dresses with a baptismal bent, embroidered in metallic thread “creating a halo around the girl,” he said poetically. He breathed new life into the house chain mail, showing total metal mesh looks, fringed and hooded, jingling as the models processed through the medieval hall where guillotines fell during the French Revolution. (Pick it all apart, though, and there was a lot to wear, including fringed chain mail shawls, capelets, hoods, crop tops that would go great with jeans, and ankle grazing, jingling skirts.)
Tailoring had a military vibe, with delicate floral embroideries bordering an officer coat, and pure white papal lace softening a pleasingly prim black pantsuit. Tapestry patterned draped

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Rick Owens RTW Fall 2020

You might have gathered from his galavanting across the California desert in a Moncler kitted-out Airstream trailer (and showing off his killer abs on Instagram), that Rick Owens, the once geeky kid from Porterville, has been on a bit of a nostalgic trip lately. He’s mined his Mixtec heritage and the rock gods of his youth for his runways, first Kiss designer Larry LeGaspi, and now Gary Numan, godfather of electronica and star of the sublimely Rick-titled 2016 doc, “Android in La La Land.”
In true form, the designer contacted Numan, humbly asking if he could remix some tunes for his show soundtrack. And he said “yes,” opening up the floodgates for Owens to explore his teendom in the dystopian Eighties, when Numan’s calculated artifice railed against “the banality of a decaying world” — not unlike the one we’re living in today, plagued by killer viruses and apathetic politicians.
“He’s always considered a C-list David Bowie…but I like that he was more obscure and more underground…he is repetitive, hypnotic, more alien and sleek than Bowie,” said Owens, likening his leather jumpsuits and expressionlessness to a cartoon of a German artist.
The result inspired one of Owens’ more accessible collections in recent memory, still

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Dries Van Noten RTW Fall 2020

“She’s a party girl.” So the soundtrack labeled her, lest you missed it from her brash, ebullient regalia.
One wonders if Dries Van Noten was at all concerned about a letdown after last season’s brilliant fashion-moment collaboration with Christian Lacroix. If so, you couldn’t tell by his fall runway. It exploded with a very different kind of exuberance as Van Noten made a 180-reversal from spring’s pretty wonderment toward a harder, tougher take on chic.
“It’s about nightlife…” Van Noten said backstage after his show. “Going out, enjoying life, having fun — [fun is] very important — and a party girl. [There’s] something mysterious, something dark, something romantic, but a dark romance.”
He started with pictures of the work of makeup guru Serge Lutens, and pondered, “How would a girl like this look now, how would she use makeup?” His answer: audaciously. This collection was all about color and pattern and overstatement. But most of all, it was about attitude, the attitude of a woman who not only dresses to be noticed, but lives to be noticed and to revel in the joy of showing off. To that end, she paints her hair with strokes of vibrant red or blue, and her eyes

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Kenzo RTW Fall 2020

These are tough times for the travel industry. With the coronavirus outbreak severely curtailing air traffic, many people are opting to stay at home. Suddenly, even the trusty student ritual of backpacking across the planet is looking less alluring.
Not so for Felipe Oliveira Baptista, whose father was a pilot and who, as a result, has travel in his DNA. His debut coed collection for Kenzo was all about wanderlust — though the concept of shelter came hand-in-hand.
Cloaks, capes, cowls and caps shielded his models from the bright sunlight raising temperatures inside the plastic tubular tent set up in the garden of the National Institute for Deaf Children. The venue felt like an apt metaphor for conflicting urges: wanting to be out in the world, yet protected from its dangers.
The designer conceived the collection like a dialogue between himself and founder Kenzo Takada, who revolutionized French fashion in the early Seventies with his colorful, unrestrictive clothes and came to show his support.
Baptista channeled that spirit with flowing capes printed with collages of tiger paintings by Portuguese artist Júlio Pomar, or prints drawn from the Kenzo archives: roses or horses painted into soft, camouflage-like motifs. An army green, full-body cocoon, shaped with

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Thebe Magugu RTW Fall 2020

For his first presentation at Paris Fashion Week, South African designer Thebe Magugu created an immersive experience. Guests entered a dilapidated screening room in the basement of the Palais de Tokyo to discover mannequins wearing African masks sitting on chairs facing a screen projecting a short film.
All around the room were oversize images shot by Kristin-Lee Moolman, featuring items from the fall collection against the backdrop of the Ipopeng township in the mining town of Kimberley, where Magugu was raised. The name of the suburb translates as “beautify yourself” in Setswana.
Committed to manufacturing in Africa, the winner of the LVMH Prize for Young Designers produced just 10 looks for his “Anthro 1” fall line as he works to upskill his suppliers.
There were variations on shirtdresses — some with sheer lace insets at the elbow — and feminine pantsuits. A lilac logo trenchcoat came in a check print inspired by the tablecloth in his grandmother’s kitchen, while a shirt and cropped pants featured a stripe motif made by photocopying strips of denim.
Leather bags were handcrafted in Johannesburg and featured the brand’s new logo designed by Commission Studio in London. An emblem of sisterhood, it shows the silhouettes of two seated women

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Guy Laroche RTW Fall 2020

For fall, Richard René tried his hand at upcycling. Scouring the Internet, he turned up a dozen Guy Laroche vintage pieces, and took a stab at it — or them. 
René dipped a printed blue silk dress from the late Eighties in black ink, turning it into a blouse and paired it with high-waisted wool trousers, completing the look with a repurposed wool trenchcoat — from the Seventies this time — and adding a layer of patent leather fish scales. It looked good and felt modern. 
Another dress, equally suitable for the era of office secretaries with hair-sprayed hairdos, was updated as a chic evening gown, the waist drawn in and the skirt stretched down, with fat strips of patent leather to add length. 
He also found bolts of ivory, crepe fabric from the Seventies which he worked into new designs — the material clung to the body like a “Star Trek” suit, looking sleek and sensual as a jumpsuit, or a hip-hugging dress with prominent shoulders, but a bit awkward as a pleated skirt-blouse combo. 
With no production — there hasn’t been in three years — and a limited budget, René’s experiment in upcycling has turned up a compelling proposition for a brand

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Anrealage RTW Fall 2020

Kunihiko Morinaga nurtured his inner child for fall, taking wooden bricks as his building blocks and creating boxy panels of fabric that snapped together interchangeably to form a range of outsized, exaggerated mix-and-match silhouettes.
While the underlying fabrics and clothes referenced — a trenchcoat, chunky knitwear, a padded bomber jacket and indigo denim — were mostly familiar, the direction in which he took these staple wardrobe items was far from it.
Squares, rectangles, semi-circles and triangles of fabric were fixed together in what the designer described backstage as a comment on diversity and sustainability, with each part designed to be combined in myriad ways — the simplest combinations consisting of around five panels, the most complex up to nine.
For fashion’s indecisive — it’s not often you can choose to wear a trenchcoat, tweed, a puffer skirt and pink fake fur all at once — the lineup offered quirky appeal. But it also had less of the poetic intensity of Morinaga’s last two collections.

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Dior RTW Fall 2020

“CONSENT,” flashed three big neon signs suspended from the ceiling, one each in yellow, red and green. They blinked on and off inside the tent installed at the Tuileries Garden for Maria Grazia Chiuri’s Dior show. Additional signs around the perimeter proclaimed, “Patriarchy = CO2,” “Patriarchy = Repression,” and “We Are All Clitoridian Women.”
The timing of this particular installation was uncanny, the day after Harvey Weinstein got his comeuppance in court, convicted of rape and a criminal sexual act. The set was the work of the feminist art collective Claire Fontaine (the duo of Fulvia Carnevale and James Thornhill). The name of the show, “I Say I,” is translated from “lo dico io” an exhibit of Italian women artists opening next month at Rome’s National Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art, and sponsored by Dior. The exhibit takes its name from a piece by the Italian art critic and feminist writer Carla Lonzi. (This show drew on ample material; the press notes had footnotes.)
Chiuri’s feminist dedication is admirable, as is the free rein she gives to the artists she enlists for her sets. But this messaging crossed over from pro-women activism to an unsubtle subtext of “men suck.” There was

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Coperni RTW Fall 2020

For the past six months, Coperni’s Sébastien Meyer and Arnaud Vaillant have had the World Wide Web on their minds. With good reason: they have been working on the relaunch of their web site, which went live a few hours after the show.
The collection, which the pair designed around this launch and “as an homage to the web,” they said, traced a digital native following the footsteps of Sir Timothy Berners-Lee — the computer scientist who invented the global information system in the late Eighties — in her exploration of this ever-changing frontier.
The digital realm was celebrated everywhere: in the animated GIF invitation that featured a snippet of HTML code fading away to reveal the address; in the venue, the French start-up incubator Station F, and in the clothes themselves.
There was nothing virtual about this smart lineup, which kept to the minimal yet uber-cool vibe they cultivate. A T-shirt that said “Enter the Web” featured part of the brand’s web site code printed on the inside. Woven elements nodded to the idea of an interconnected web. Elsewhere, the network’s immaterial nature was alluded to in transparent textures or in skirts and tops that felt like they were mirroring each other,

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Koché RTW Fall 2020

Christelle Kocher’s fall collection was the first since her Koché label joined forces with Renzo Rosso’s fashion group OTB, and it showed.
Set in a cavernous hall at the AccorHotels Arena in Paris, the coed display had a nocturnal ambience, accentuated by the dingy lighting generated by floor projectors. It opened with one of her signature polo dresses, only done in black leather with dramatic leg-of-mutton sleeves.
Leveraging OTB’s expertise in denim through its flagship brand Diesel, Kocher had a field day with the material, sending out Canadian tuxedos galore. A patchwork shirt was paired with a skirt with a sweeping train, while those puffy sleeves were worked into a tight-fitting blouse tucked into a low-crotched pair of baggy jeans.
“I wanted it to be an evolution because this new partnership we have with Renzo is like a new beginning for the brand, with the opportunity to use high-quality manufacturers,” she said backstage. “It’s about how I can bring my personal touch to it through the cuts and embellishment.”
While a mosaic-style denim pant and skirt looked a little bulky, Kocher hit her stride with embroidered and embellished jeans, paired with a bodysuit studded with Swarovski crystals and topped with heaps of pearls and

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Philipp Plein Issues Statement on Kobe Bryant Tribute in Fall Show

The Internet was very upset with Philipp Plein over the weekend.
The designer presented his fall collection in Milan last weekend and paid tribute to Kobe Bryant and his daughter, Gianna, with purple and gold-encrusted hoodies and jerseys bearing the number 24, Bryant’s second jersey number and Plein’s name in the Los Angeles Lakers font. The extravagant show also had gold Philipp Plein-branded helicopters, planes and yacht on set, with the helicopter drawing the ire of many who were outraged at the thoughtlessness and the capsule collection.
The designer issued a statement on Monday saying, “The catwalk set-up was already planned and designed in November 2019, way before this tragic accident occurred, this is the reason why they were gilded helicopters on the runway. I would have clearly removed them if possible, but it was too late to replace them.”
Many took to social media to express their outrage, claiming that Plein was capitalizing on the tragic accident that claimed the lives of the Bryants and seven of their friends and teammates. The show also commenced days before the tribute memorial for the Bryants.
Regarding the tribute capsule, Plein said he decided to “celebrate Kobe Bryant’s legacy” with the capsule collection “and made clear

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Annakiki RTW Fall 2020

With a theme as current as the danger of fake news, the sartorial possibilities were endless. Anna Yang chose to address the issue in little touches, bringing a dystopian edge to her characteristically bright silhouettes. A pink taffeta minidress with balloon sleeves looked sweet enough, until you spotted the metal screws coming out of each side of the model’s head. Some of the silhouettes — all done in bright colors and with Eighties shoulders — were finished off with silver helmets covering half of the model’s head — contraptions destined to “protect the brain,” according to the press release.
Standout looks were a rainbow striped suit jacket — which was startlingly vivid, like when you turn up the brightness on your phone screen by mistake — and a printed oversize coat and leggings combo. From afar, the print looked quaintly flowered; up close, it turned out to be an aggregation of icons from the most popular phone applications.

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Fila RTW Fall 2020

There was a slick, Space Age feel to this collection, the first, full fall effort under creative directors Antonino Ingrasciotta and Josef Graesel. The duo took inspiration from cold-weather heroes, including the Italian mountaineer Reinhold Messner, and spun climbing, skiing and sports clothing into pieces for everyday life. Standout looks included slim puffers and sweaters adorned with abstract mountain silhouettes in white, blue or gray. Models wore elegant white puffer shawls-come-dresses, or all-black jackets more suited to urban terrain. The presentation was fun, with scarves, sneakers and gloves suspended inside huge blocks of real ice, and a soundtrack meant to echo climbers’ boots crackling on the frozen snow.
WWD Critique: Ingrasciotta and Graesel are having fun plundering the Fila archives and viewing this sports brand through the lens of fashion and streetwear. They are turning Fila into a thoughtful, polished collection that just happens to be inspired by outdoor sports.

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I’m Isola Marras RTW Fall 2020

Here is the witch. After presenting a pre-fall collection inspired by Heather, Mike and Josh, the protagonists of “The Blair Witch Project,” Efisio Marras put his personal interpretation of the Blair Witch on the stage. Playing with a black-centered palette, the designer gave the collection a mysterious, nocturnal vibe. The brand’s signature young and girly mood moved into tailoring. Blazers with inlaid vests were matched with slightly flared pants and classic spencers inspired the silhouettes of cropped bombers embellished with embroideries and matched with flounced dresses splashed with graphic floral patterns. Chic, feminine dresses boasted delicate lace inserts, while maxi cardigans exuded a cool, artisanal appeal, revealing Marras’ passion for the grunge look.
WWD Critique: Cohesive and focused, the collection was the best presented by Marras so far and defined the I’m Isola Marras image.

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Ones to Watch: Paris Fashion Week Fall 2020

Winnie fall 2020 
Courtesy

WINNIE
Perhaps his American contemporaries were hanging out at the mall. But when he was a teenager, Idris Balogun, the founder of New York-based label Winnie, took to “the Row” — Saville Row — in London. Landing his first apprenticeship at age 15, Balogun, who grew up in a family of Nigerian immigrants, said he feels lucky to have learned the tricks of the trade at an early age — tailoring and pattern-cutting.
“The guys on Savile Row kind of think of themselves as a separate entity from fashion,” he explained, noting they stuck to the classics, avoiding the fashion industry’s seasonal churn. He himself felt the pull and eventually moved to the design studios of Burberry and Tom Ford.
“I kind of found beauty in that, in the seasonal operation, because there’s always newness,” he said. He got himself into trouble, at times, suggesting fresh ideas.
“Like, ‘Well, why do we have this line here, instead of putting it here?’ or ‘How come our lapel can’t be a bit slimmer?’ But all houses have rules and you kind of have to kind of stick to those rules when you’re a cutter,” he said.
A stint at the Fashion Institute of Technology landed

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Kenneth Ize RTW Fall 2020

It’s not often that a debut show at Paris Fashion Week can boast Naomi Campbell on the runway. The British model, wearing a colorful-striped belted trenchcoat, closed Kenneth Ize’s runway display on the opening day of the French shows, in a sign of the growing importance of African fashion on the international stage.
“She made this happen, to be fair. She’s part of the journey since Day One in my career,” said the Nigerian designer, a finalist for last year’s LVMH Prize for Young Designers.
She wasn’t the only heavy hitter on hand. Model-turned-designer Liya Kebede applauded from the front row as a diverse cast paraded in Ize’s colorful coed creations, in a blend of patterned knits, Austrian lace and his signature striped aso oke cloth with fringed hems.
To be sure, Ize’s designs are not for shrinking violets. A fearless colorist, he loves piling on the striped motifs, layering up to three different patterns on a single look. And why wouldn’t you, when the handwoven fabrics — an emerald shirt and pants with a fringed belt in particular — seemed to positively shimmer with color.
But what was truly striking was the way he blended traditional and modern silhouettes. Alton Mason’s checked tunic

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Les Copains RTW Fall 2020

Les Copains is springing to life again under its new owners, Super Srl, controlled by the Bologna-based Zambelli family, which purchased the  brand last September. For this first season under new ownership, the team worked up wardrobe staples that included soft Breton sweaters; lightweight, nubby cashmere knits and lean, pleated skirts with a Seventies vibe. A featherweight peacoat in the brand’s signature navy blue rubbed shoulders with a dusty rose chubby that looked like fur but was made from mohair yarn. There was lots of tailored clothing, too, in traditional fabrics.
WWD Critique: The Zambelli family clearly knows what it’s doing, focusing on luxe staples at contemporary prices. This collection didn’t push any style boundaries, but it was modern, beautiful and wearable.

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How to Watch Giorgio Armani’s Fall 2020 Show Live

Giorgio Armani said late Saturday evening that his signature brand’s women’s fall show will be held behind closed doors, “given the recent developments of the coronavirus in Italy.”
“The show will be filmed in an empty theater, without press and buyers” and live-streamed at 4 p.m. CET/10 a.m. EST on Feb. 23, the company said in a brief note.
The designer was meant to hold two shows, at 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. CET, in his Via Bergognone headquarters, closing Milan Fashion Week, which kicked off on Feb. 19. “The decision was made to avoid exposing guests to any dangers to their health,” said the company. Armani held his Emporio Armani fall show on Friday.
You’ll be able to watch the show right on WWD.com: Just check out the video player below to see all of Armani’s new designs.

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Coronavirus Impacts Milan Fashion Week
Eyewear Trade Show Mido Postpones Dates Due to Coronavirus
Unilever Employees in Italy Isolated Due to Coronavirus

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Giorgio Armani RTW Fall 2020

Milan Fashion Week came to an end behind closed doors on Sunday, with Giorgio Armani showing his collection without an audience after a spike in cases of the coronavirus over the weekend sent shock waves through Italy, closing some museums and schools and forcing event cancellations — but not keeping people from shopping on Via Montenapoleone, it should be said, some wearing masks.
The Armani show went on online — and during the live-stream, models could be seen walking around a reflecting pool with flowers and hanging vines conjuring a ghostly nocturnal garden. On the runway, romance ruled with softened military silhouettes, flashes of pink, loads of velvet and camouflage floral patterns.
The designer rendered maxi coats in soft black or blue velvet and reinterpreted camo as an abstract pink and gray or pink and blue petal pattern on silk maxi skirts and trousers, and at least one matched set resembling a kind of femme paratrooper uniform. On the subject of softness, a hot pink, zip-front “fur” jacket over a pale gray balloon skirt looked luxe for faux, and pink satin pants peeking out from an exquisite black velvet robe coat made for a fun touch.
As always, jackets were hero pieces, and

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Laura Biagiotti RTW Fall 2020

Staged behind closed doors due to the coronavirus outbreak, the Laura Biagiotti fall collection was set against a lush garden in tune with clothes inspired by an imaginative trip to the countryside.
Nodding to nature and to the company’s sustainable efforts, the opening look set the tone for the entire lineup: A grass-green body-hugging knit dress with a midi skirt was crafted from regenerated cashmere and accessorized with a long scarf bearing the phrase “Be Green.” Roomy argyle knitted frocks worn under maxi cardigans in the same pattern and khaki pants tucked into mid-calf booties worn with shirts featuring tapestry-inspired floral motifs exuded a country chic attitude.
Lavinia Biagiotti played with contrasting elements for cargo pants crafted from traditional men’s wear fabrics softened by cozy knitwear with plunging V-necks and paired with slouchy overcoats.
WWD Critique: As she carries forward the company she inherited from her mother, Biagiotti reinvents the house codes with laid-back elegance and a modern twist.

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Boss RTW Fall 2020

Ingo Wilts wants to bring a bit of color to his Boss collections — and surprise people by doing so. “Typically everybody says that the Boss palette is centered around dark navy, green and black, to which we reply: not this time,” Wilts said backstage.
The tone was set from the first look at the venue: a lilac carpeted music hall in which guests sipped matching mauve smoothies while waiting for the show to start. Models walked out to a live string orchestra wearing a precise curation of colors to complement the traditional black, navy and gray Boss looks. Lilac, a daring tone for men’s wear, looked particularly good on masculine suits, while the hue freshened up an oversized duster coat and snuggly knitted polo neck jumper for women. Rust tones brought warmth to leather coats and trousers for men, as did pops of orange on parkas and faux-fur coats.
Texture was added in the form of long fringes on suits, sleeveless dresses and leather handbags, a nod to the Charleston dresses of the Roaring Twenties in honor of the new decade, and zebra patterns on coats, skirts and men’s jackets. “We didn’t want a print that was just a print,

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Piazza Sempione RTW Fall 2020

Stefano Citron and Federico Piaggi looked at Anjelica Huston’s style in the Seventies to find that balance between sartorial elegance and feminine glamour they wanted to inject into their fall lineup. For example, an impeccable Prince of Wales suit was worn with a Lurex top, while a tailored tweed coat was layered on a chic shirtdress printed with a graphic motif.
WWD Critique: Rooted in the brand’s practical elegance, the collection offered a commercially savvy offering of well-executed everyday essentials with a twist.

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How to Watch Prada’s Fall 2020 Show Live

The fashion label Prada, which presented a “spectacular” spring 2020 line, is slated to present its fall 2020 collection at 4 p.m. CET/10 a.m. EST on Feb. 20.
You don’t have to go anywhere to see all of designer Miuccia Prada’s creations: just scroll down and check out the video player below to all the runway action.

Read more from WWD: 
Prada Postpones Resort Show in Japan
Inside Prada’s Spring 2020 Collection
Prada Unveils New Fine Jewelry Collection
WATCH: The Milan Fashion Week Spring 2020 Trends You Need to Know 

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Gianluca Capannolo RTW Fall 2020

Gianluca Capannolo said he is trying to focus on special pieces. In keeping with this strategy, he employed rich jacquard fabrics, a special shimmering jersey enriched with pearls and rhinestones, as well as satin peppered by ostrich feathers. He used them for cocoon coats, A-line frocks and draped tunics.
WWD Critique: Even if he put the focus on eveningwear, the designer continued to work with his signature uncomplicated, yet impeccably constructed silhouettes for a range of body types.

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Bottega Veneta RTW Fall 2020

The question going in: a year into his role, could Daniel Lee survive the meteoric ride on a squishy It Pouch and live up to the hype? The answer coming out: You betcha.
On Saturday night, the designer’s vision for Bottega Veneta came into full focus: slightly subversive, wonderfully weird stealth wealth for the Turbulent 2020s.
At 34, Lee is one of the first children of the Nineties to head a major luxury house and his affinity for the decade characterized by all black and minimalist grit punctuated by the acid flash of rave culture, was on full display on the runway, which articulated a way forward for fashion that was not minimalism, maximalism or street, but a meeting of all three (sans logos, of course).
Backstage, he acknowledged the Nineties “are embedded” in him, but said it was Bottega Veneta’s trailblazing handbag history that was his starting point — specifically, how the brand made its name breaking with Sixties structured bags and introducing softness and sensuality into the category with leather weave intrecciato.
That thought led to more freedom, movement and comfort in the clothes, which in previous collections have been a wee bit unwieldy and stiff.
Vive la différence.
He still worked his now-familiar

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Max Mara Atelier Fall 2020

German painter Anselm Kiefer, known for the use of natural, raw materials, served as inspiration for the Max Mara Atelier fall collection, which spanned 14 coat designs crafted from a wide range of fabrics. From a mannish style to a cape-like design and the effortless cardigan coat, the collection played with a restrained palette of  autumnal colors, such as burgundy, brown and gray. Luxury materials, including doubled cashmere, alpaca, camel hair, shearling and mohair were paired with special details, such as leather inserts, as well as fox-fur collars and detachable vests.
WWD Critique: Max Mara’s hero product, the coat, was exalted in a wide range of timeless investment pieces.

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Giorgio Armani to Hold Fall 2020 Show Behind Closed Doors

CHANGE OF PLANS: Giorgio Armani said late Saturday evening that his signature brand’s women’s fall show will be held behind closed doors, “given the recent developments of the coronavirus in Italy.”
“The show will be filmed in an empty theater, without press and buyers” and will be visible on Armani.com, the brand’s Instagram and Facebook accounts at 5 p.m. CET, the company said in a brief note.
The designer was meant to hold two shows, at 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. CET, in his Via Bergognone headquarters, closing Milan Fashion Week, which kicked off on Feb. 19. “The decision was made to avoid exposing guests to any dangers to their health,” said the company. Armani held his Emporio Armani fall show on Friday.
As reported a few hours earlier, international eyewear trade show Mido has postponed its upcoming edition slated to run Feb. 29 to March 2 at Milan’s Rho-Fiera fairgrounds due to uncertainty over the coronavirus epidemic in Italy.
The fair’s organizer said the trade show would be held between the end of May and early June.
As of Saturday night, according to media reports, 60 Italians were diagnosed with the virus in the past two days, including 47 people in the Lombardy region, of which one resides on the

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Etro RTW Fall 2020

The Etros are bundling up, and saddling up, for fall, whipping blankets into fringed coats and shawls, working warm woolen checks and plaids into tailored pieces and taking style cues from Argentina’s gauchos.
Last month, Kean Etro sent out his wooly layers and paisleys in the brand’s men’s wear show, and his sister Veronica Etro led those trends into women’s territory, adding flashes of gold thread, silver studded leather and cashmere.
“I was into coziness, everything that wraps and protects. So a lot of knitwear, a lot of capes and warmth, loose fabrics. And then, at the same time, a lot of tailoring, and the eternal charm of the dandy,” Etro said. “I call them haute bohemians.”
Prince of Wales check suits with cropped trousers and boots recalled Argentina’s horsemen, while long tassel-edged or plaid coats came cinched with thick, silver-studded leather belts. Indeed, some models look like they’d walked off the runways of Ralph Lauren, with their shrunken, striped ponchos, fringed blanket coats and wide-brimmed hats.
Prairie dresses glinted with gold threads and were printed with swirls and little dots. “I call them the cosmic prints because they seem like constellations, or like fireworks in the night,” said the designer, who covered the

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Tod’s RTW Fall 2020

Tod’s first look clearly telegraphed that a new creative director is in place: easy and baggy sea-blue corduroy pants, worn under a mannish beige blazer and azure blouse, a wool scarf casually wound around the neck.
Walter Chiapponi, who joined the company in October after years working at Bottega Veneta with the brand’s former creative director Tomas Maier, said he “wanted to give a soul and a total look to Italian lifestyle.”
He succeeded, with a collection that had a romantic vein, seen in the mannish gray felt coat delicately embroidered with azure flowers, as well as a Seventies’ hippy touch, as in the patchwork leather coats. A beautiful plum coat was sensually worn over a pair of corduroy pants, a large hobo bag a must-have.
Chiapponi developed Tod’s bread-and-butter moccasins with chunky heels and thick stitches on the toes. In sync with the sustainability efforts the industry is putting in place, he used existing scraps of leather in structured clutches.
There were also several denim jeans, not often seen on the Tod’s runway, and puffers, which contributed to the younger mood of the collection.
Chiapponi’s interest in Fifties architecture and art — he listed Alberto Burri, Lucio Fontana and Gio Ponti as some of

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Versace RTW Fall 2020

Versace has had a banner season — nearly breaking the Internet with the last women’s runway show by sending out Jennifer Lopez in (almost) the same jungle-print gown she wore to the 2000 Grammys, then outfitting new-gen voluptuous beauty Lizzo as a Hollywood goddess for the Oscars earlier this month.
But on the runway Friday night, there were no star turns other than Donatella herself, projected Warholian-style in repeating portraits on the digital video screen spanning the 40-meter runway. She may still be the figurehead, but there’s no denying the house of Versace has changed under Capri Holdings: it’s less about charting new design territory, and more about repackaging greatest hits, with a few updates for the changing times. Having tackled age inclusivity (thank you, Nineties supermodels and J.Lo) in September, this season, it was on to gender.
“Today’s generation does not care about gender…there’s no female or male,” the designer said during a preshow press conference of her decision to take her show coed. That was after she opened with a few choice words about the horrific rise in hate crimes around the world: “What happened in Germany a few days ago is almost the last drop, I mean, we need

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Versace RTW Fall 2020

Versace has had a banner season — nearly breaking the Internet with the last women’s runway show by sending out Jennifer Lopez in (almost) the same jungle-print gown she wore to the 2000 Grammys, then outfitting new-gen voluptuous beauty Lizzo as a Hollywood goddess for the Oscars earlier this month.
But on the runway Friday night, there were no star turns other than Donatella herself, projected Warholian-style in repeating portraits on the digital video screen spanning the 40-meter runway. She may still be the figurehead, but there’s no denying the house of Versace has changed under Capri Holdings: it’s less about charting new design territory, and more about repackaging greatest hits, with a few updates for the changing times. Having tackled age inclusivity (thank you, Nineties supermodels and J.Lo) in September, this season, it was on to gender.
“Today’s generation does not care about gender…there’s no female or male,” the designer said during a preshow press conference of her decision to take her show coed. That was after she opened with a few choice words about the horrific rise in hate crimes around the world: “What happened in Germany a few days ago is almost the last drop, I mean, we need

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Fendi RTW Fall 2020

Extreme dieter Karl Lagerfeld didn’t hold back when it came to his disdain for larger sizes, once telling an interviewer “nobody wants to see curvy women.” But Silvia Venturini Fendi is in charge now, and on Thursday night she put inclusivity front and center on the Fendi runway with more sizes (Paloma Elsesser) and ages (Carolyn Murphy and Karen Elson), marking a new era for the house.
What would Karl say?
“Times change and he was always ready to change his mind…,” Venturini Fendi said backstage, explaining that for her second collection working as a solo act following Lagerfeld’s death last February she wanted to think about “the woman I want to dress — strong, independent and free, but within the traditional codes of femininity.”
That meant drawing inspiration from boudoir and silver screen femme fatales, including those Lagerfeld himself costumed for the Seventies film, “Maitresse.”
”It was a movie that made a big scandal at that time because it’s the story of a woman who lives in Paris in a two-floor flat and on one level, she has a very bourgeois and normal life, and in the basement she is a dominatrix,” Venturini Fendi said.
Both stories were on display in this collection, which was

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Luisa Beccaria RTW Fall 2020

Florals aren’t just for spring: designer Luisa Beccaria delivered a botanical extravaganza for her fall collection, which was inspired by a winter garden and shown during a presentation at Lu’Bar, the restaurant helmed by her children Lucilla, Lucrezia and Ludovico.
In addition to her usual romantic dresses — a pink princess gown with an embroidered tulle skirt, a high-neck chiffon dress in a pink Liberty print — Beccaria experimented with elements from a winter wardrobe to make her delicate, floral-printed silhouettes weather-appropriate: thin floral-print turtlenecks were worn with most of the looks, including a light gray velvet dress with white embroideries and a Peter Pan collar worn over faded flowery leggings. There were a couple of outerwear options, such as a faux fur burgundy jacket and pink herringbone coats.
Dark blue foliage silhouettes snaked up straight-leg denim jeans, and an allover chintz was spotted on a chiffon dress, matching turtleneck, fabric boots and even the sofa the model was sitting on. The styling was cleverly done: all the models sported blue hair, giving a bit of edge to the looks, while the allover floral prints were almost surrealistic on some of the silhouettes: The models literally blended into the background.

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A. Teodoro RTW Fall 2020

There is a detail in Elsa Schiaparelli’s biography that has remained stuck in designer Albino Teodoro’s memory: When she felt uninspired by the contents of her wardrobe before going to a party, Schiaparelli confessed to simply draping herself in a piece of fabric, tying it directly around her body.
The focus was very much on fabric and wild volumes in A. Teodoro’s fall collection, including an extravagant raw silk red opera dress with pouf sleeves that would have been a perfect match for Schiaparelli’s eccentric taste. The designer presented a compact collection of 20 silhouettes in a restricted color palette of black, cream and red, delivering an exquisite selection of evening looks that are begging for a red-carpet moment.
A cloud-like white top was paired with a flowing black silk skirt tied simply on its side, while a stunning black flower-printed jacquard suit jacket had, instead of buttons, a cropped bustier corset holding it together. Even the outerwear had couture touches: a boxy black wool coat was turned into a statement piece of its own by the addition of a voluminous asymmetric front ruffle in black duchesse satin.

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Fabiana Filippi RTW Fall 2020

An architectural inspiration met the softness of rich and warm fibers in the Fabiana Filippi fall collection, which was all about an elegant daywear wardrobe peppered by special details. Channeling a sartorial inspiration, the brand presented a chic gray skirt suit showing a blazer with an inlaid belt putting the focus on the waist for a feminine silhouette. Asymmetric knitted sets and dresses exuded effortless elegance, while a chocolate brown pleated tulle evening gown showed the most glamorous side of the brand’s timeless aesthetic.
WWD Critique: For sure, Fabiana Filippi is known not only for the upscale quality and for the wearability of its designs, but this season the label also demonstrated the ability to play with current trends seamlessly integrating them in its elegant fashion language.

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Jil Sander RTW Fall 2020

Old Celine? Fuggedaboutit. There’s a new brand of intellectual femininity to believe in: Jil Sander.
On Wednesday night, designers Luke and Lucie Meier proved to be new leaders of Milan Fashion Week with their spectacular collection shown at Casa del Design, the city’s forthcoming museum of industrial design.
In a soothingly spare white hall with arched windows evocative of a church, the models walked out as if in ceremony, taking seats in simple cane chairs lining the runway. It meant all the more time to linger on the gorgeous clothes, which at every turn managed to be restrained without being plain, feminine without being overly frilly, special without feeling like one-season wonders.
“It’s not about minimalism, it’s about purity,” Lucie Meier said backstage, explaining the duo’s approach, which felt more everywoman accessible than ever this season.
Tailoring was contoured to the feminine form, as on a beautiful curved black coat with soft ties at the wrist that could be a wardrobe hero piece, and on a black sleeveless long line blazer shaped at the waist, and side-slit skirt, both made of ribbed knit for a soft touch.
Cape details added noble grace to several pieces in the collection, including an ivory ribbed cashmere sweater dress

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How to Watch Moschino’s Fall 2020 Show

Moschino will soon reveal its fall 2020 collection: the brand’s Milan Fashion Week presentation is scheduled for 8:30 p.m. CET/2:30 p.m. EST on Feb. 20.
The show comes after Jeremy Scott showcased a pre-fall line inspired by New York City in December and a spring 2020 line inspired by the works of Pablo Picasso in September.
What’s next for the label? You’ll be able to see all of Scott’s new designs by bookmarking this page and returning at showtime to see them in the video player underneath.

Read more from WWD: 
Nike, Gucci and Moschino Drop Collections for the Year of the Rat
Moschino Unveils Capsule With Budweiser
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WATCH: Rodarte’s NYFW Fall 2020 Fashion Show Featured Glam Vampire Brides

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Alberta Ferretti RTW Fall 2020

Will the real Alberta Ferretti please stand up?
It’s been two years since the designer once known for ethereal evening pivoted her business to daywear, but it’s still a bit unclear what exactly she stands for.
While the spring 2020 collection was about boho separates filtered through rose-colored, Seventies glasses, fall 2020 was about…well, too many things.
The collection seemed to reference the Eighties, with a pleated pants-palooza of yuppie checked cashmere tailoring and chunky gold jewelry, as well as cool-girl riffs on the leather dressing trend that had pleated trousers tucked into tall boots, worn with oversize bombers. The new denim was old denim — in a washed black, pleated baggy silhouette, worn with soft spun mohair sweaters. It was all OK, but lacked the kind of distinction that would make one sit up and say, “Oh, that’s Ferretti.”
Then out came enough ruffles, ruches, fringes and frills to party like it’s 1989. Candy-colored puff-sleeve blouses tucked into skirts ending just over the boots, and black chiffon gowns and aprons weighed down with metallic brocade or silver fringe embroideries occasionally veered down the path of matronly.
Even if the idea was to zigzag between two sides of the dressed-up Eighties canon, it was hard

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Brunello Cucinelli RTW Fall 2020

Brunello Cucinelli has carefully and clearly molded and sharpened its luxurious image season after season and the brand is further emphasizing its identity for fall.
“We went back to some minimalism, cleaning up in an important way,” said Carolina Cucinelli, daughter of the namesake founder. This doesn’t mean eschewing elaborate workmanship, as in the beautiful organza bomber with sequined trims or the embroidered, irregular crochet top with a three-dimensional foliage effect.
In Cucinelli’s world, minimalism meant lots of winter white, beige and graphic touches of black as well as an intriguing juxtaposition of men’s wear fabrics with feminine details. Examples included a tailored light charcoal blazer with bold shoulders tucked into a floor-length, pleated and fluid napa leather or tulle skirt.
Leather was more relevant than usual in this collection, which had a strong equestrian inspiration. High boots were worn with knee-length Bermudas and cozy ribbed sweaters fit for any English countryside walk. Cucinelli played with masculine and feminine elements pairing pinstriped pants or pied-de-poule vests with an allover splatter of sequins and laminated leather blouses.
Shirts were oversize and worn like a coat in the softest cashmere ever — after all, one wouldn’t expect any less from Cucinelli.

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Gucci RTW Fall 2020

Is fashion a religion? Alessandro Michele thinks it’s pretty close, with the runway show its most revered ritual. Michele dedicated his fall Gucci collection to the multitiered ritual of designing, making, staging and viewing a fashion show. He spoke of the show ritual in intimate terms, and seemed to channel old-school insider passions.
“Fashion is a complex mechanism, it’s theatrical. All of us work for this ritual, that is almost religious,” Michele said during his post-show press conference, a session filled once again with deep fashion thoughts delivered in a stream-of-consciousness monologue, save for a question or two interjected by a couple of intrepid journalists. Before he was finished, Michele would liken fashion to a circus as well as religion, and his creative role to that of a doctor and physicist. He would explain snippets of his soundtrack — the Fellini voiceover (he’s “talking about the sacredness of cinema and how much ritual there is) and Ravel’s Bolero (“a march that seems to keep going indefinitely”).
Fashion believers, Michele claimed, want to break free but can’t. “It traps you. We are all trapped. Everybody — the hairstylists, the makeup artists, everybody working together so hectically — we all say that one day

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A.L.C. RTW Fall 2020

Andrea Lieberman is direct in her design approach and evolution for A.L.C. “I never think it’s a radical departure for us,” she noted. “It’s very focused on our girl, her story, her life, her needs. For me, I definitely feel like it’s a lot about keeping things modern.”
To that end, she focused on classic items meant to round out a covetable wardrobe: Think tailoring, knitwear and jeans cut with a preppy Seventies spirit. She brought in interesting textures with chintz pleated fabrics and drapey, side-ruched corduroy tops tucked into the perfect high-waisted straight-leg jeans. A warm palette of auburn, sumac and earth tones made a roomy coat, furry jacket, sweaters and clingy knits more inviting. A tight pink polo cut with a low neckline maintained the perfect balance of nostalgia, proportion play and attitude. “These are things she puts in her closet,” Lieberman concluded. They fill “a real need in a woman’s wardrobe in a modern, sexy and effortless way.”

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7 Highlights From New York Fashion Week Fall 2020

While the New York Fashion Week fall 2020 schedule lacked a number of major designer brands, the week was still full of memorable moments that sent social media abuzz.
This season, designers’ front rows had a number of viral moments, namely Leslie Jones at Christian Siriano, where videos of the comedian enthusiastically cheering on model Coco Rocha sent social media into a frenzy, and at Brandon Maxwell, where stars from Netflix’s new docu-series, “Cheer,” sat in the front row and gave each model their famous “mat-talk.”
Other designers brought some added star power to their shows, including Miley Cyrus walking at the Marc Jacobs show, Debbie Harry singing at Coach and Orville Peck performing at Michael Kors.
Read on for the seven highlights from New York Fashion Week fall 2020.
1. Miley Cyrus Models in Marc Jacobs’ Fall Collection

Miley Cyrus walks at the Marc Jacobs fall 2020 show. 
WWD/Shutterstock

Marc Jacobs knows how to end New York Fashion Week with a bang.
Jacobs followed up last season’s show — where he began with the models’ finale walk — by creating a performance art piece for his fall 2020 collection, enlisting 54 dancers that scattered around the stage as groups of models walked in between them.
Among the chaos,

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Roksanda RTW Fall 2020

This kaleidoscope of a collection was one of Roksanda Ilincic’s most powerful — strong on color, texture and references to the work of female artists Lee Krasner and Rana Begum, whose tie-dyed fishnets were strung across the ceiling of a courtyard at the Foreign & Commonwealth Office.
Filled with regal shapes and culinary colors such as grape, bordeaux, blueberry and orange, this grand outing had a certain Joan of Arc toughness about it, and tapped into the emerging London mood. Designers have been sending out sturdy wool tailoring, supple leather, long lengths and sleeves. It’s a new suit of armor for the everyday warrior who’s fighting on the personal, professional and political front, and who wants to look fabulous, and feel comfortable, as she gallops into battle.
Ilincic showed off silk gowns with regal capes spilling down the back, and long two-tone dresses with voluminous tiers and ruffles. Bright colors burst from a sweater made from chunky braids and loops of yarn, while a belted coat was a patchwork of wooly color and texture. A pattern resembling shards of colored glass covered a dress with long, billowing sleeves that gathered gently at the elbow.
There was so much here for fashion-loving warriors: The roomy layered suits — some

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Rejina Pyo RTW Fall 2020

Rejina Pyo dialed down the quirkiness of past collections, adamant that her clothes satisfy “working women who need to get on with their lives. I wanted these to be plain clothes done in a beautiful way. I don’t want to be in a dream world.”
So she sent out leather blouses with square necklines and mismatched buttons; delicate, shiny pouf-sleeve tops and bouclé pencil skirts; rough-edged overcoats layered over hoodies, and perky sweater and trouser combos in colors like brown and cantaloupe. The highlight was a colorful patchwork fur pieced together from factory-floor offcuts.
WWD Critique: Pyo — a wife, mother and designer — has always designed for women like herself, and it’s refreshing to see her serve up working woman basics with a new, more sophisticated twist.

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The Biggest Social Media Moments From NYFW Fall 2020

New York Fashion Week fall 2020 might have lacked some major designers, but the season was marked by a number of viral celebrity moments that played out on social media.
Comedian Leslie Jones, for one, caused a stir when she boldly cheered on models from her front row perch at Christian Siriano’s fall 2020 runway  Videos of Jones quickly went viral, with the comedian seen standing and enthusiastically cheering on model Coco Rocha, screaming: “Show them how it’s done baby!”

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‪Ok here is the video that everyone recorded me recording LMAO! You can’t take my ass no where!! You think Jerry from cheer got “mat talk”!! I got that “carpet talk”!! @csiriano @cocorocha #loveher #allofthemodelswasbanging ‬
A post shared by Leslie Jones (@lesdogggg) on Feb 6, 2020 at 6:52pm PST

The star-studded front row at Tom Ford’s fall 2020 runway show in Los Angeles also produced a number of social media moments, including when Miley Cyrus was seen taking selfies with Lil Nas X, who famously partnered with the singer’s dad, Billy Ray Cyrus, on last year’s hit song, “Old Town Road.”

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why was i cheesing

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Emilia Wickstead RTW Fall 2020

No one does ladylike like Emilia Wickstead. And for fall 2020, not only did she fully embrace her identity but kicked things up a notch. Referencing Mexican actress Dolores del Rio and her flair for drama, she let her audience into her polished, glamorous world, where the art of dressing up and all things lady are always celebrated.
Models carried the trains hanging off their cowl-draped tops; accessorized their voluminous black lace dresses with matching lace-trimmed hats; and matched their charming, wallpaper-printed cocktail dresses to their clutches and gloves.
In a modern world where dress codes are becoming less relevant and casual wear is king, Wickstead’s approach felt refreshing.
“This whole ladylike vibe has been so true to my brand, so I thought why don’t I just really punch it up this time?” Wickstead said.
But as much as she loves dress-up and drama, Wickstead isn’t one to rest within the confines of her fantasies and forget her end consumer.
That’s why she also looked to the more controlled aesthetic of Del Rio’s husband, the art director Cedric Gibbons, who inspired her to look to the Nineties and sprinkle cleaner, more practical silhouettes into the range. Here were fitted jumpsuits in neutral hues; cropped knits and

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Simone Rocha RTW Fall 2020

Simone Rocha looked underwater for inspiration for fall. She sprinkled elements of sea life throughout the collection, but in classic Rocha style, nothing felt literal or too straight-forward.
There were earrings that resembled shark teeth, heavily knotted deconstructed knits that brought ropes to mind and pearl-encrusted net bags to mirror “sailors’ nets catching pearls.”
Rocha did not stop there — she also brought in ideas of baptism clothes in the floral-embroidered borders on her crisp cotton shirt dresses and elsewhere added a tougher, more punk edge via the big red heart appliqués she added to tulle skirts. She melded it all with her own distinct vocabulary: tulle dresses, puff shoulders, bows and glitter galore that fit right into the grand setting of the neo-classical Mayfair mansion Lancaster House, where the show was staged across multiple rooms.
New and old references came together to create a charming mash-up of materials, colors and textures that was true to the brand’s signature style. But Rocha also offered plenty of new ideas to take in: She added a bigger dose of tailoring and made it hers by splicing blazers and adding tulle or regal satin drapes on the shoulders, as well as more graphic, playful prints featuring anchors

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Pringle of Scotland RTW Fall 2020

Fran Stringer took inspiration from Pringle of Scotland’s archives, revisiting a black-and-white graphic pattern and a traditional knitting technique known as Sanquhar that yields repeating, pixelated patterns. Her collection was timeless and bold.
Blown-up cherry and lemon motifs popped on soft intarsia knits. They segued into brightly colored sweaters in mint green, orange and red. These offset monochrome pieces with geometric grid patterns and a capsule collection of “twin sets” — brown sweaters worn over matching loose trousers.
“We tend to find that people are drawn to natural wool colors or brights,” said Stringer, who favored oversize, boxy silhouettes.
She added some new motifs, including a shell pattern for some sweaters, and some seamless constructions. She also worked with recycled yarn, and plans to incorporate it into more styles going forward.

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Molly Goddard RTW Fall 2020

After wowing London with her bursts of tulle and voluminous proportions in highlighter colors or inky blacks, Molly Goddard has recognized that it’s time to move on. Her signature big dresses and sheer, ruffled and layered skirts have been praised in the press, copied by the high street, and featured on the small screen. So where to go from here?
For fall, Goddard did push the collection forward, mixing in a dash of tailoring – a russet check suit for men and women alike – and some slimmer silhouettes to balance out all the volume: A long and lean ruched dress had a ruffle at the bottom while trousers toned down a short, pouf-y tunic dress.
The Scarlett O’Hara proportions were out in force, but Goddard dialled down their grandeur, pairing them with chunky soled shoes, striped or Fair Isle knits, some with homemade crochet flowers dangling from them. The result was a collection that was charming in parts, but too busy with petticoats, knits and layers. It lacked the sophistication and polish of past seasons.
Goddard’s pieces are statement-making and they’re also pricey: A primrose yellow tulle dress is on Matchesfashion now with a price tag of 6,000 pounds, while a slimmer, ruffled one costs

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Marques’ Almeida RTW Fall 2020

Marta Marques and Paulo Almeida said that they were obsessed with what it means to be young, and their collection felt like a nostalgic representation of a generation past.
It seemed as though the designers were reminiscing over their high-school days and different camps of kids: artsy ones wearing watercolor ensembles, punks in striped and oversized shirts, and the popular crowd in ruffled prom dresses.
There were as many ideas here as there were bright and boisterous colors alongside a few denim pieces – a mainstay of the Marques’ Almeida brand. Satin was a mainstay, employed for ruffled embellishments along the shoulder and across the body.
Bright faux fur was also used to add texture or as a standalone piece such as a bright yellow Big Bird style jacket. Elsewhere, a multicolored graffiti print jumpsuit fought for attention. There was a lot going on and it felt like the collection was going through some growing pains – like the young they were trying to represent.

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David Koma RTW Fall 2020

David Koma staged his fall 2020 show at the Leadenhall building, the same East London skyscraper he picked last season.
This time around he went 42 floors up, though, perhaps a sign of his intention to up the ante, take more risks and “close one chapter and start a new one.”
He did that by paying homage to London, “the city that made his dreams come true,” and by melding new and old ideas in a collection packed with attitude and confidence.
The embellished, body-hugging dresses were familiar, but there was also a wider offer of well-tailored blazers and mannish coats, embellished knits, denim jumpsuits and a heftier dose of accessories that fit right in with his signature evening dresses.
References to London were apparent throughout, from the prints featuring the city’s skyline to the 3-D crystal-embellished minidresses that were shaped like landmark buildings and could double as armor.
What stood out was how Koma was unafraid to play with bad taste, be it the extra-large crystal brooches on a cropped jacket, the corsets layered over T-shirts or the letters hanging off a high slit spelling out London.
It was all exaggerated and in-your-face, capturing the city’s wonderfully eccentric nature.
As his business, which just turned 10,

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Shrimps RTW Fall 2020

Sure, there’s “The Crown,” but designer Hannah Weiland would argue that she has always been fascinated by all aspects of Queen Elizabeth. For fall, the brand’s signature sustainable faux fur was channeled into chubbies dotted with rosettes; leopard-print coats and toppers adorned with chunky statement buttons, or strewn with a pink flower print. Models dressed in striking, floor-sweeping coats resembled younger versions of Princesses Margaret and Diana, and the Queen herself.
WWD Critique: Outerwear was the star of this runway drama, and it’s good to know Weiland is using recycled fabrics to make her fur. The snoods layered under many of the coats were knitted from alpaca wool in Peru.

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Charlotte Knowles RTW Fall 2020

This was a tale of two collections: Lovely leather pieces, outerwear and knits shared a runway with sheer, skintight printed trousers and flimsy dresses that resembled scraps of fabric. There is no doubt that Alexandre Arsenault and Charlotte Knowles are dab hands at design, but the whole underwear-as-outerwear aesthetic is tricky territory as it can look cheap, sleazy and unflattering. The stylish standouts here were a slim, cognac-colored leather corset; a cropped shearling jacket; a short and sweet knitted cape with little tassels and a mauve sweater slashed at the bottom. The long and curvy belted plaid coat that closed the show was another winner.
WWD Critique: If these designers want to become more commercial and reach a bigger audience, as they have said, then they should pour their energies into the outerwear, and leave the innerwear where it belongs, in the boudoir.

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16Arlington RTW Fall 2020

16Arlington made its runway debut in a highly ambitious way, with a wider-ranging collection that included more daywear, plenty of show-stopping gowns — and a guest appearance from Lena Dunham.
Designers Marco Capaldo and Kikka Cavenati felt that their woman is now all grown up and needed more balance in her wardrobe, so they broadened their offer to include more pared-back looks in the form of chic leather staples in neutral tones, from suits to classic trenches and color-block midi dresses.
Those looks spoke to the minimalist wave that’s overtaking the runways and the streets right now, but it was the evening portion of the show that really had heads turning. The duo, who was inspired by photographer Ren Hang and wanted to celebrate the “female body in its purest form,” indulged their audience with all things opulent and sparkly in a series of show-stopping dresses draped close to the body and featuring endless layers of marabou feathers, crystal embellishments and decadent brocade fabrics.
The more intricate, red-carpet-worthy gowns that closed the show highlighted the label’s growing celebrity following, with Dunham among their biggest fans.
“We became friends after working together on a custom piece and the rest is history. We are all about

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Matty Bovan RTW Fall 2020

It was bonkers in the best, most joyful way possible: Think tinsel curtains turned into headpieces, larger-than-life wigs, rolls of fabrics attached to the garments and any material combination one could imagine possible, from bejeweled denim and brocade to stiff pin-striped wool patched together with casual jersey and tulle.
Matty Bovan wanted to create an “out-of-body” and “out-of-proportion” experience that challenges people and pushes their perception of taste. That’s why he focused on exaggerated silhouettes that created distorted, angular shapes around models’ hips and backs and mixed all sorts of materials together to create a crafty, undone look.
The bright colors and rich textures only helped make Bovan’s visual feast more exciting: He custom-made a metallic brocade fabric that was morphed into draped jackets and big-volume dresses and showcased his impressive knitting skills with a range of intarsia-knit pieces featuring graphic patterns and the word “Exit” all over — a not-so-subtle reference to Britain’s exit from the European Union last month.
“Everyone’s discussing this kind of seismic shift, and what it actually means. You can’t help but think about it — this is just a more joyful interpretation of leaving and going out into the world. It’s not naive, but a celebration of

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Marina Moscone RTW Fall 2020

“Everyone knows I’m a minimalist, but I think it’s important to convey, too, that being modern doesn’t have to be bare and minimal,” Marina Moscone explained after her intimate and divine fall show, set once again at The Player’s Club in Gramercy Park. Known for tailoring, both sharp and loose, as well as twisted draping and bias slipdressing, Moscone wanted to convey modernist Seventies glamour, the “Anjelica Huston wearing Halston,” type in her designs. Elegant tuxedo dressing came in the form of double-faced, heavy wool suiting and sweeping smoking jackets with bijoux buttons; slinky, twisted slips and tunics also incorporated intertwined, diamanté details. 
The designer evolved her signature solid tunic-over-pant looks into double-faced Scottish Donegal hand-knit sweaters atop dresses with pleated and lace-trimmed hems while familiar, fluid separates were paired with nubby alpaca sherpa topcoats with upcycled mink collars. This importance of tactility goes hand-in-hand with the prominence of artistry within Moscone’s collections. For fall, burnout-velvet stemmed roses and solid black velvet floating panels adorned slips (as well as a singular jade pantsuit) while long, hanging strands were hand-pulled through embroidered leopard patterned transparent organza voile gowns, all of which felt more refined than her prior, more crafty (but still polished) takes. 
Even

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How to Watch the Marc Jacobs Fall 2020 Fashion Show

Marc Jacobs is about to close New York Fashion Week: the designer will present his fall 2020 runway show at 6 p.m. ET on Feb. 12.
After presenting a spring 2020 show that “was an extravaganza of pure joy and exceptional fashion,” what’s next for Jacobs and the brand? You’ll be able to find out by visiting this page at showtime and checking out the video player below.

Read more from WWD:
Marc Jacobs’ Fashion Shows: A Brief History
Marc Jacobs and Charlotte Rampling Play Tongue-Twisters for Givenchy
Hot Dogs and Yellow Cabs: The Marc Jacobs Brought New York to Paris
WATCH: NYFW Fall 2020 Trends and Highlights

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Kallmeyer RTW Fall 2020

For her fall collection and look book, Daniella Kallmeyer referenced artist Cindy Sherman’s portrait series, exploring the gender binary and breaking down the typical ideas of femininity, both of which the designer also explores in her work. 
Kallmeyer described the artist’s series as “moments that were beautiful, but you felt a little strange about it, a little bit uncomfortable, but also turned on and intrigued by it.” She emulated this feeling through mood and color (mustard yellow and greens, khaki and reds), rather than strangeness in the items themselves, adding, “the items are all about ease and elevation, feeling strong and powerful while also feeling comfortable.” 
Suiting, as always, was prominent, as were delightful pleated offerings (like a navy shirt with knife-pleated collar and matching trousers with full pleats of alternating widths), among other sophisticated wardrobe staples. Unisex offerings were designed to work for however her customer associates on the gender and sexuality spectrums — sleek trousers could be cinched up high for a paper-bag high waist or worn low on the hips as a slim dropped pant; knitwear could be worn either oversize or tailored, depending on the wearer.
WWD Critique: Kallmeyer’s fall collection incorporated smart, aspirational wardrobing with fluidity and flexibility

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Norma Kamali RTW Fall 2020

“I did this sort of as a roundup,” Norma Kamali explained in the midst of her fall collection preview. “For me, resort is always the beginning — June is where we have a little baby flower and we go July, August, September. So the roundup is that these are all the fabrics and prints you should have in your wardrobe and if you wear them together at any time, it’s going to be great.” Kamali was referring to her fall array of “classic prints,” i.e., animal (zebra and leopard), check (houndstooth and glen plaid) and floral prints on her signature silhouettes, which she styled (as always) on women and men. While her women’s look book featured straightforward looks for sales, her men’s included the same looks, mashed-up stylistically as dictated by each wearer’s personal style.
The biggest news for the season was the resurgence of garments from Kamali’s 1976 OMO Gym activewear line, which she re-created in terry (a grouping she will be expanding for resort) in sporty, retro shapes with graphic logos splashed atop for fall.
WWD Critique: Amidst a plethora of prints, Norma Kamali’s fall lineup marked a resurgence of her archival activewear line, OMO Gym.
 
Read more reviews from WWD:
Norma

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Miley Cyrus Models in Marc Jacobs Fall 2020 Runway Show

Miley Cyrus has made her New York Fashion Week fall 2020 debut.
The singer joined a host of other models for Marc Jacobs’ fall collection, which closed out New York Fashion Week. Cyrus modeled a black bra-like top with matching trousers and was holding a zebra-print coat.

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@mileycyrus walked in the @marcjacobs #NYFW show.⁣ Tap the link in bio for more. Report: @laylailchi ⁣ —⁣ #wwdfashion⁣ #nyfw ⁣ #marcjacobs⁣ #mileycyrus
A post shared by WWD (@wwd) on Feb 12, 2020 at 3:23pm PST

This isn’t Cyrus and Jacobs’ first time working together. The singer teamed with Jacobs in 2013 for a charitable T-shirt which showed the slogan “Protect the Skin You’re In” inscribed on top of a nude Cyrus.  She later starred in the designer’s spring 2014 campaign photographed by David Sims. Last year, the duo teamed again to support Planned Parenthood, designing a pink hoodie that read “Don’t F—k With My Freedom.”
Cyrus also wore a look from Jacobs’ fall 2013 collection to the Met Gala that year, which celebrated its “Punk: Chaos to Couture” exhibit.

Miley Cyrus wears Marc Jacobs at the 2013 Met Gala. 
David Fisher/Shutterstock

Jacobs doesn’t shy away from enlisting celebrities in

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Marc Jacobs RTW Fall 2020

Marc Jacobs and I go way back. We started in the industry at about the same time, and in WWD’s then-idiosyncratic breakdown of which market editors covered which designers, I “got” Marc. Certainly, I have admired his work throughout his career and the ups and downs of his company and brand. Some may say too much.
But after Wednesday night’s New York Fashion Week finale, that was all beside the point, for will someone please tell me who in New York is a better designer, more creative, more provocative, more capable of delivering a thrill? And how many lists of “greatest designers in the world,” both current and over the past 30 years, would he not make? Jeez, the guy’s good.
Jacobs is an extraordinary designer, his talent part pure fashion acumen and part showmanship. Over the years, he has staged some incredibly engaging shows, the kind now called “experiential.” This one might take the cake: a band of 54 dancers under the brilliant direction of choreographer Karole Armitage comingling with 88 models in an extravaganza so exquisitely audacious and compelling and masterful that it’s a shame it was one night only. This was a museum-worthy performance-art piece — one that would sell

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Vera Wang RTW Fall 2020

You couldn’t have watched the Oscars for its fashion content and not have thought that the eveningwear industrial complex could use a little disruption. Plenty of pretty dresses, but among the non-mistakes, only Janelle Monáe’s sparkly Ralph Lauren was remotely interesting. One would be hard pressed to deliberately put together an assemblage of more boring clothes.
Vera Wang didn’t have a major show pony in the race on Sunday night. She does have deep experience with evening, including huge celebrity exposure. For fall, Wang focused on trying to advance what “evening could be,” she said during a backstage at the grand James B. Duke house on Fifth Avenue. “I was looking at something a little bit lighter, a little bit easier, something with a charm and a lightness, a little athletic and esoteric.”
Charm and lightness, check and check. Yet there’s a strangeness to Wang’s work that’s invariably compelling and — at its best — fabulous, each gesture carefully considered for depth of message. What other crossover ready-to-wear/bridal designer uses more color in the latter than the former? This time Wang went to rtw town with color, putting her oddly in sync with one of the season’s major trends. She showed lavender,

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How to Watch the Coach Fall 2020 Fashion Show

The fall 2020 Coach runway fashion show is almost here.
The brand — which counts Jennifer Lopez and Michael B. Jordan as ambassadors — will present its newest looks on Feb. 11 at 2 p.m. during the tail end of New York Fashion Week.

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How about a game of Clue, #NYFW edition? The phone is from the early ‘80s and there’s an icon waiting on the line for you. Any guesses? Find out who, Feb 11 at 2 PM ET during the #CoachFW20 runway show, live on #Instagram. #CoachNY
A post shared by Coach (@coach) on Feb 10, 2020 at 7:08am PST

You’ll be able to see executive creative director Stuart Vevers’ designs without leaving the house: just bookmark this page and return at showtime to see all the runway looks in the video player underneath.

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J. Mendel RTW Fall 2020

Gilles Mendel has built his business on eveningwear, using his signature pleating techniques and exquisite embellishments. For Mendel, the fabrics are where his story begins, and for fall he had several materials engineered, like a burnout velvet on organza, while others were crafted from intricate embroideries. Each felt unique and precious, amplified under his skilled hand with draping and construction, for a range of sensual gowns and cocktail frocks. He added new iterations of his classic hand-pleated-style gowns — like the one Idina Menzel wore to the Oscars — some had new geometric patterns on strapless bustiers attached to skirts that cascaded down the body. He also showed some outerwear ideas, like a few interesting puffer jackets with flower appliqué details.
WWD Critique: Mendel’s couture-like handiwork really shone through in his evening assortment for fall, especially his intricately crafted dresses made from engineered fabrics.

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Pantone Fall 2020 Colors Make a Splash at NYFW Street Style

The street style set is embracing Pantone’s fall 2020 colors at New York Fashion Week.
The Pantone color projections are becoming a big street-style trend this fashion week, popping up in monochromatic looks, statement accessories and mixed prints. The colors are said to encourage experimentation and the blending of traditional hues, highlighting shades that are said to be genderless, seasonless and all-inclusive.
Pantone’s leading fall 2020 color, Amberglow, a dusty orange, has proven to be a favorite for many who are looking to the hue for monochromatic looks or paired with neutral pieces.

Colder temperatures and rainy weather has had many embracing the color projections for outerwear, including one of the more vibrant colors of the bunch, Samba.

Scroll on to see more of Pantone’s fall 2020 colors at New York Fashion Week and click the above gallery to see more fashion week street style photos.
Fall 2020 Colors: Classic Blue 

Fall 2020 Colors: Sandstone

Fall 2020 Colors: Rose Tan

Read more here:
What to Expect at New York Fashion Week Fall 2020
7 Street Style Trends from NYFW Spring 2020
9 New York Fashion Week Events That Are Open to the Public
WATCH: NYFW Fall 2020 Runway Recap

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Coach RTW Fall 2020

Debbie Harry joining punk rock band The Coathangers to perform live Blondie’s hit “Dreaming” was definitely one of the highlights of New York Fashion Week so far.
The Coach show offered an energizing moment of fun on a gray, rainy winter day. Stuart Vevers re-created “the quintessential New York City loft” in a former warehouse on 12th Avenue as a backdrop for his fall collection. The men’s and women’s apparel and accessories were intended to continue a narrative that started last season when the designer presented his interpretation of “stripped-back New York cool.”
“This is chapter two,” Vevers said during a preview at the Coach headquarters the day before the show.
The fall collection of “pop heritage” daywear pieces was designed to blend the brand’s 79 years of history with Vevers’ self-confessed “pop-culture obsessions.” The designer also tapped Jean-Michel Basquiat’s abstract artwork to emblazon on pieces such as a trenchcoat, a sweatshirt, a scarf and a range of bags in distinct geometric shapes such as triangles, circles and rectangles. Celebrating the collaboration with the Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, Vevers invited the late artist’s sisters, Jeanine and Lisane, to the event, while Basquiat’s niece, Jessica Kelly, walked the show.
Cool, covetable outerwear pieces, including trenches

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Reem Acra RTW Fall 2020

At Reem Acra, fall came with a relaxed, free-spirited bohemian vibe. Aiming to present a versatile collection, approachable for different women, Acra kept the silhouettes uncomplicated and never too body-hugging. Billowing sleeves and flared shapes defined a range of textured silk evening dresses embellished with jewel-like details at the neckline and the cuffs, while caftan-inspired styles were crafted from lush velvet for a cozy effect. Playing with separates, she paired striped ball skirts with coordinated mini vests, as well as soft knits with plissé bottoms in iridescent colors.
WWD Critique: Taking a step back from hyper-embroidered and embellished designs, Acra embraced a new sense of modern elegance that combined simplicity and preciousness.

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Jonathan Simkhai RTW Fall 2020

“Simple, easy, modern and clean” is how Jonathan Simkhai summed up his fall collection. That may sound like a no-brainer, but it’s not easy. And yet, it’s what American fashion has always done best, and Simkhai’s solid fall outing was exhibit A.
The Los Angeles-based contemporary designer focused on tailoring more than he has in the past. “Because that’s what women want to wear in the fall,” he said of the theme, which led to accessible riffs on wardrobe classics, including trenchcoats, pants suits and sweater dresses.
A tailored houndstooth jumpsuit and another black-and-beige color-blocked trench jumpsuit were smart new takes on the all-in-one trend. And an open-back detail added drama to a paprika-colored, draped, fringed dress.
How to marry tailoring and cozy comfort dressing? How about a camel blazer meets sherpa jacket? The designer was able to pull it off, giving a sharp-cut tailored blazer faux fur leopard sleeves without adding too much bulk, and pairing it with fluid camel trousers. An orange, black and beige wool sherpa-cum-bomber jacket over a draped black wool fringe blanket skirt was also cold-weather cool.
Not forgetting his signature pleating and lingerie details, Simkhai showed a black draped single-shoulder dress in vegan leather that was pretty enough

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Alice + Olivia RTW Fall 2020

Stacey Bendet’s eclectic tastes extend beyond Alice + Olivia. She’s in the throes of designing her new apartment, where the rich tapestries, textures and bold pops of color planned for the space have influenced her globetrotter lineup of eclectic mixed-print dresses and elaborate evening attire. As always, there was an undercurrent of feminine glam rock, and range, from vegan leather separates and clean monochromatic colorblocking (this season always paired back to black for some grit), to the playful volume of sleeve treatments and a maxiskirt with a Michelangelo print. She offered new takes on tailoring with a brocade suit amped up by a painterly print T-shirt with pearl piercings along the neckline, and even had an eye toward sustainability by enlisting “zero-waste Daniel” to craft Ts and jackets out of fabric scraps.
WWD Critique: Bendet’s eclectic personal tastes provided fashion fodder for every type of woman — whether traveling or going out — with a signature thread of empowered femininity.

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How to Watch the Michael Kors Collection Fall 2020 Show Online

Michael Kors is returning to New York Fashion Week for fall 2020.
The fashion show for his label, Michael Kors Collection, will take place Feb. 12 — with the brand already sharing images on social media of accessories, including several handbag styles, that will be featured.

A preview of the MKC Monogramme North-South tote from our upcoming Fall 2020 #MichaelKorsCollection runway show. Discover the entire collection live this Wednesday at 10 AM (EST) and in stores this fall. #AllAccessKors #NYFW pic.twitter.com/iZammFisCc
— Michael Kors (@MichaelKors) February 9, 2020

Watching the show Wednesday without a special invite will be simple: Just bookmark this page and return at 10 a.m. ET that day to get a glimpse of every outfit in the video player below.

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Carolina Herrera RTW Fall 2020

Carolina Herrera hails from that complicated, once-thriving fashion space of traditional, tony lady dressing. As creative director, it’s Wes Gordon’s mandate to transition the brand to a younger, more versatile take on that genre, one with more currency and less hauteur, without sacrificing polish. During a preview, Gordon said having defined his own codes for the house — which draw on the house founder’s: color, exuberance, a sense of joy — he now feels ready to express them with less cacophony, focusing more on singular “grand gestures” per look, rather than trying to say too much at once.
Gordon showed at The Shed, where the light radiating inward through the massive glass enclosure looked lovely even in pre-rain gloom. Covering the 14,000-square-foot floor: off-white carpeting, which will be shipped off to a company called Carpet Cycle for recycling. While the set pulsed with modernity, Gordon looked backward for inspiration, to the 17th-century Baroque painter Francisco de Zurbarán, whose work he recently discovered. From it, Gordon took his vibrant, saturated palette and often his color combinations.
He also translated an aura of serenity not typically associated with such upbeat hues. His models wore little obvious makeup save for lipstick from the new Carolina

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Dion Lee RTW Fall 2020

Dion Lee started another strong collection with the introduction of jewelry. As a designer who likes to play with elements of seduction and skin-baring elements, he didn’t just show earrings and necklaces, he wove his unique chain-link constructions through men’s and women’s clothing, making them an intrinsic part of the garment. They gathered fabric, held together the pleats of dresses and created interesting smocking techniques on a hoodie and leather skirt. Viewed up close, you could appreciate the intricacy of how they were engineered through knitwear, running the length of one arm to the other.
That led to the notion of suspension, where chains became waistbands for low-rise pants, and woven underwear (leather and fishnet) peeped through cutouts at the hip and above waistlines. “It’s really focusing on the hip region and the shoulder region in the collection [and] weaving underwear to the outside of clothes or exposing them in different ways,” Lee noted. It was applied to men’s on similar cutout pants contrasted with sexy clingy tanks.
Lee’s sweet spot is his subversive handling of tailoring — including hook and eye details on blazers that came undone to alluring effect — yet quieter monochromatic looks in soft drapes of blush and

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Jonathan Cohen RTW Fall 2020

Jonathan Cohen staged his runway amid beautiful florals in an abandoned artist’s loft in Lower Manhattan, foreshadowing the balance of pretty and gritty inherent to his fall lineup.
Known for prints and textiles, he offered loyal fans a variation of roses in various stages of bloom, via artistic hand sketches, micro floral patterns and 3-D embellishments. “When I think about how I started sketching and designing, it was very gestural,” Cohen said. “We did these gestures of people dancing with roses blooming on them. Then we abstracted them.”
That notion of gesture and movement was evident in pieces that felt soft and relaxed, even while Cohen drew silhouettes closer to the body in a new direction for the brand. He twisted short dresses to the side with gathered fabric, at times with tonal looks to highlight construction details or with printed dresses adorned with upcycled pearls from Swarovski compiled into abstract rose patterns.
An air of uptown grunge coursed through the collection — as it has at several other shows over the past couple of days — seen here when a prim blazer with shoulder poufs was styled over a mini plaid dress or when a coat composed of felted scraps was grounded

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Zadig & Voltaire RTW Fall 2020

Childhood memories inspired Cecilia Bönström’s fall coed collection for Zadig & Voltaire.
In particular, a photo album dating back to 1977, when she was seven years old, influenced the overall mood of the lineup.
Major Seventies’ references ran through the collection. However, the designer didn’t just look to the more Bohemian, free-spirited side of the decade, but to a certain bourgeois Parisian sophistication, which definitely felt appropriate for a French urban brand.
Sartorial suits, sometimes featuring oversize jackets with strong shoulders, were juxtaposed with silk shirtdresses and separates, such as midi skirts worn with blouses enriched with soft bows, all paired with high boots. Heritage shearling coats, jacquard sweaters, safari shirts and leather flared pants definitely stressed the lineup’s Seventies’ spirit.
WWD Critique: Even if sometimes it seemed to be evoking signature pieces of luxury power houses a little too literally, such as Balenciaga’s oversize technical outerwear and Celine’s metallic minidresses, the collection felt highly approachable and ready for the closets of the coolest city kids.

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Jason Wu Collection Fall 2020

Orchids and Egon Schiele. It might sound like an unlikely pairing, but it actually worked extremely well.
The flowers, a symbol of sensual love but also of elegance in many cultures, and the works of the Austrian expressionist artist, known for his erotic and deeply psychological paintings, served as the source of inspiration for Jason Wu, he explained backstage at his show.
The designer collaborated with artist Jessica Underwood on feminine, graphic orchid patterns, whose sinuous lines echoed Schiele’s style, printed on dresses, including a green frock with a plunging V-neck and  an asymmetric design with knotted details.
The curved silhouettes of orchids was also echoed in the floral swirls of sophisticated evening dresses that had a lightweight delicacy, enhanced by the soft bows tied in the back. Other precious details, like a cascade of feathers on a range of dramatic gowns, tiny crystals embroidered on see-through evening frocks and a hyper chic cape and a suit crafted from gray wool embellished with intricate hot pink contrasting piping, exuded timeless glamour,
“With this collection I really wanted to showcase New York’s craftsmanship, because we don’t get credit for it,” said Wu, who, with his highly sophisticated, interesting collection, worked in a refined color palette,

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Nicole Miller RTW Fall 2020

Nicole Miller’s “rock-‘n’-royalty”-themed fall show started as a spoof of sorts on the royals’ recent media frenzy, then evolved into an offering of rock-star-inspired attire.
Aside from crows printed on shirting or tacked on to jackets, the line leaned more rock than royal. Newness came through a more androgynous spirit, inspired by David Bowie, with male models clad in her more non-binary offerings: shearling and faux-fur coats, leopard- and floral- printed slacks and button-up silky shirting. Throughout the rest of her women’s wear, Miller continued to balance her signature tough-femininity. Leather, velvet and silk offerings with paisley prints or English military-buttons made up a majority of the collection, with rose-adorned frocks sprinkled in between.
WWD Critique: While the collection held plenty of Miller classics, the lineup felt fresh, thanks to its Seventies spirit and more androgynous styling.

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Avalanche’s Kadri exits with injury after fall

Nazem Kadri appeared to twist his left leg as he back-passed the puck after a faceoff, and he left the game in the third period.
www.espn.com – NHL

Ulla Johnson RTW Fall 2020

Ulla Johnson’s fall collection portrayed a determined, assertive femininity. The lineup exuded the brand’s signature Bohemian, free-spirited and nomadic vibe and an empowered attitude that was underlined by both the bold silhouettes and the extensive use of leather, cut for example for pants paired with brocade tops and chic car coats, which added a sharper, more urban look. The label’s iconic artisanal touch resonated in charming crochet dresses, in cozy thick sweaters peppered by abstract and graphic interpretations of wild animal motifs, as well as in a range of blanket-inspired patchwork quilted frocks and separates.
WWD Critique: Season after season, Johnson has been shaping a very clear, strong image for her label; while she is mostly known for the feminine ruffled dresses inspired by her adventurous travels across the globe, she is now smartly exploring more urban, quotidian territories.

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Adam Lippes RTW Fall 2020

Adam Lippes’ own characterization aside, the fashion quotient of what he calls his “small-f” approach to fashion isn’t so small. His fall collection was like the blue-sky Saturday morning on which he showed — serene in mood, bold in clarity and beautiful to boot. Lippes showed in Veronika, the new restaurant in the Fotografiska photography center on Park Avenue South, which, like his clothes, projects a non-minimal take on sophisticated chic. Guests settled into banquettes to enjoy a breakfast of quiche, fresh fruit and pastries. Lippes kept the soundtrack calm and the preshow mood conducive to conversation, as if replicating the kind of non-show setting in which women might reasonably wear his clothes.
For fall, he was inspired by Umberto Pasti’s Rohuna garden in Morocco, a theme he worked lightly in variations of a dark-ground floral print, the blooms small-ish on a silk dress and blown up on a straight, collarless coat and one of several short, boxy jackets that he paired with pleated trousers—his customer loves a great pant. He knows because he spends a lot of time with her during store visits. She also favors sensual clothes with an aura of propriety, delivered here in fluid dresses and pleated skirts-and-shirt

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Badgley Mischka RTW Fall 2020

Badgley Mischka married “Downton Abbey” with the Beatles for a show titled “Downton Abbey Road.” The theme could be seen in the sumptuous fabrications of velvets, laces and brocades. Designers Mark Badgley and James Mischka used a wide range of colors, with some painterly florals on dresses, a mix of shiny metallic gowns, and their trademark selection of black gowns. “We always do a jet-black section,” the duo said backstage. A wide-leg tweed pant under a long-sleeve belted jacket made of both floral and leopard panels pumped up the volume on the embellishment side of things. Suiting nodded to the Victorian era with strong shoulders and a white stiff ruffled collar at the neck. The designers were quick to point out that the collection will sit at retail during what is shaping up to be a rough year politically, and they wanted to make clothes for a woman to feel empowered and beautiful. Longtime client Muffie Potter Aston agreed, exclaiming backstage, “beautiful, strong and confident.”
WWD Critique: With this well-rounded collection of dresses, suiting and gowns, the Badgley Mischka women will have lots of options for her event and gala schedule come fall.

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Romeo Hunte to Incorporate Vintage Hilfiger Into Fall Line

Romeo Hunte has always considered Tommy Hilfiger a mentor, so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that the Brooklyn, N.Y.-born designer turned to his idol as inspiration for his fall collection.
The graduate of the Fashion Institute of Technology launched his women’s line in 2014 and expanded into a full men’s ready-to-wear collection in 2018. His street chic collection has been embraced by celebrities including Beyoncé and Victor Cruz.
At his show this weekend, Hunte will be channeling Hilfiger by integrating archival looks and fabrics used by the designer over the years into his own brand.
As Hunte described it: “Tommy Hilfiger has produced some of the world’s most timeless pieces that are still relevant [today]. For me, being able to integrate some of those capsule looks with my cut-and-sew methods, merging the narratives of both brands, means everything. Reconstructing pieces that are already assembled was [also] a contribution to support sustainable fashion.”
Hilfiger weighed in with his thoughts as well. “The next generation of American designers are looking at the fashion industry and building their collections in a whole new way. It’s been a pleasure to mentor Romeo as he’s evolved his approach and point of view — he reminds me of myself

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Claudia Li RTW Fall 2020

As she has done in the past, Claudia Li used personal memories, this time revolving around her grandfather, to ground her collection. He passed away this year and she wanted to celebrate his life by dedicating her collection to him. It was a heartfelt sentiment that she wove throughout her work, for example, with lots of plaid, as in a mix of plaid printed PVC coats and suiting. “He was always in plaid,” she said with a smile. She wanted bright colors, for instance on a bright pink shearling coat because “he was always so happy,” she added. He often took her to see goldfish when she visited him, so she made a sunny yellow print with goldfish swimming about, which she used on the panels of a slip dress. Much of the collection also explored the tension between hard and soft elements, like when Li paired denim with tulle.
WWD Critique: Several seasons in, Li is hitting her stride with a joyfully crafted collection of fun and colorful clothes with a bits of technical edge.

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Victor Glemaud RTW Fall 2020

“This collection was inspired by heritage,” designer Victor Glemaud said backstage before his first runway show. For his fall collection, the Haiti-born and Queens, N.Y.-raised designer went back to the beginning with his recognizable slashed sweaters and colorblocking. The looks, shown on an inclusive cast, celebrated gender fluidity and body positivity.
The lineup featured a variety of silhouettes, from a sexy sleeveless color-blocked dress with a slash from the collarbone to just above the belly button to a sleek orange tank dress that was perfect for nights out. There were also sporty looks, like a ringer knit T-shirt dress in black with light brown raglan sleeves. Fabrics were made of natural yarns — merino, cotton-cashmere and merino-cotton-ramie blend.
The models wore Nike Tailwind sneakers that resembled ones Glemaud wore growing up and shaved mink turbans that were a collaboration with Saga Furs. They were the designer’s homage to the Haitian women he grew up around. (His best friend, Danish designer Camilla Staerk, often wears them as well.)
During the show, the iconic rendition of the national anthem by Whitney Houston played. It embodies both the American Dream in its diversity and inclusiveness — and Glemaud’s fashion ethos.

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Josie Natori RTW Fall 2020

By hosting her fall show in the elegant and intimate living room of her chic Upper East Side apartment, where a piano player entertained the guests with live music, Josie Natori set the mood for her collection, which felt utterly personal yet sophisticated.
Perfectly reflecting the designer’s effortlessly refined style, the lineup was an ode to a polished, discreet elegance, sometimes peppered with sparkling touches.
The uncomplicated but beautifully constructed designs incorporated Eastern elements, such as mandarin collars, as well as patterns and embroideries with a charming Asian feel.
Precise but never too rigorous, separates and frocks were cut in clean silhouettes that accentuated the waist or had shoulders with asymmetric cuts. Slim pants were paired with tunics with flared sleeves as well as with feminine tops featuring sash details and impeccable blazers embellished with exquisite metallic embroidery.
The nocturnal, mainly black palette was livened up by pink and purple accents and fresh floral prints infused with a tropical mood, which conjured a sense of lively refinement. An allover sequined pajama set and a beautiful brocade gown with a sensual plunging v-neck offered Natori’s signature take on red-carpet fashion.

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Christian Siriano RTW Fall 2020

“We all have a little Harley Quinn in us.”
That was Christian Siriano’s backstage bon mot prior to showing his collection at Spring Studios on Thursday night. While it’s empowering to think we can all channel an inner pigtail-swinging, badass superheroine, Siriano made the connection less with his clothes than with his models’ colorful hair, streaked in vibrant pink and blue, just like the Joker’s volatile-spunky ex.
“Birds of Prey,” Harley’s very own movie that opens today with Margot Robbie as Harley, sponsored Siriano’s show. Beyond the hair, the most obvious visual connections (at least as indicated by the trailers), were the big white hand sculptures that punctuated the set; they were shipped especially for the occasion. “There’s this gothic fun house that was my favorite part of the movie,” Siriano said. (He saw the film in advance.) “There are these crazy life-size sculptures that I felt were almost like Dadaism, surrealist.” Siriano also worked in some major tinsel-fringe action, including a massive, shimmery ballgown inspired by a jacket Harley makes for herself in the movie.
Beyond that, the connection seemed more philosophical than stylistic. Siriano absolutely believes that every woman can be her own superhero, and that she should work her assets

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How to Watch the Fall 2020 Tory Burch Fashion Show

Tory Burch’s fall 2020 fashion show is just around the corner. The American designer is slated to present her newest designs at 10 a.m. on Feb. 9 during New York Fashion Week.
Check back here when the show is about to start to see all of her latest looks in the video player below.

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Fall in Love With Daily Pop’s Valentine’s Day Gift Guide

E-Comm: Jene Luciano, Valentine's Day Gift GuideWe love these products, and we hope you do too. E! has affiliate relationships, so we may get a small share of the revenue from your purchases. Items are sold by the retailer, not…

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Danz RTW Fall 2020

If at first you don’t succeed, try again. 
Danica Zheng, formerly the designer of Pamplemousse (a flirty, cute contemporary label), debuted her new edgier line Danz with a pop-up shop for fall that will run through Fashion Week.
Aiming to attract a cool downtown crowd, she proposed a mix of sleek tailoring and streetwear styles in silhouettes that align more with her personal style: Think sexy slipdresses with chain rope straps and drapes, sharply cut cropped blazers, vegan leather shirting and neon sport luxe items that easily sit next to the likes of Alexander Wang and MISBHV. She injected bits of her culture through modern and fresh takes on the cheongsam cut with premium satin and even offered up handbags and a jewelry collaboration with Sterling King to round out a clear vision of youthful party chic. 
WWD Critique: This debut was an impressive one, and Zheng accomplished her mission to make well-executed and desirable clothing that were both effortlessly cool and sexy. 
Read more from WWD:
What’s Coming For NYFW Fall 2020
Escada RTW Fall 2020
Common Odds RTW Fall 2020
WATCH: Short Suits Are Trending For Spring 2020

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Tadashi Shoji RTW Fall 2020

For fall, Tadashi Shoji said he was inspired by a book he recently read about the Mongolian empire between the 13th and 15th century. “For the first time in history, the Eastern world conquered the Western world,” said the designer, emphasizing the fact that the Mongolian empire embodied a wide range of cultures. That cross-pollination of different elements peppered the designer’s collection, which always centers on feminine evening dresses crafted from precious materials and cut in bold, volumes.
Colorful Middle Eastern graphic motifs were rendered with tiny beads on a fluid chiffon dress featuring sensual see-through details. Rich Balkan patterns popped up on the cozy brocade jackets trimmed with animal-free fur printed with a leopard motif, while flowers inspired by Chinese and Japanese pottery blossomed on sumptuous gowns, including an off-the-shoulder style worked in a nocturnal palette of black with iridescent blue accents.
Employing a very diverse casting, Shoji showed how his dresses, all injected with a certain timeless American glamour, work perfectly for different types of women, from the diva who cannot pass up a sequined extravaganza to the most classic dresser, who wants just the right dose of Old Hollywood elegance.

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Linder Men’s and Women’s Fall 2020

Linder held a coed presentation of reworked vintage pieces in a collage style. The approach worked best on the brand’s signature tank top for men embellished with an elaborate swatch from beaded antique classic ballgowns and patch-worked skirts and dickies made of upcycled sweaters for women. Chinese wallpaper prints and Indian sari embellishments added flair in men’s wear, while women’s played up Linder logos painted atop thrifted T-shirts and pin-tucked details on colorful shirting.
WWD Critique: Many of the pieces were one-offs and well executed, but it will be interesting to see how customers take to the brand’s new commercial bent.

Read more reviews from WWD:
Linder RTW Spring 2020
Linder Men’s RTW Spring 2020
Common Odds RTW Fall 2020
WATCH: NYFW Is Back on Top, Thanks to These Young Designers

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Mara Hoffman RTW Fall 2020

“It’s not about rethinking, but about thinking better, analyzing, reducing thoughts,” said Mara Hoffman, expressing her desire to deliver for fall a very focused collection. A pioneer in the sustainable fashion revolution, the designer used recycled wool for a chic lilac suit, as well as hemp for charming tangerine frocks and separates. Cozy sweaters were handmade in Peru of baby alpaca, while feminine frocks sported the brand’s signature bold sleeves and rounded silhouettes.
WWD Critique: The collection was all about wearable, yet special, pieces that combined utilitarian elements with a feminine sensuality — and displayed Hoffman’s distinctive creativity.

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Ralph Lauren Plans a ‘Special Show’ in April for Fall 2020 Collection

Save April.
As New York Fashion Week gets underway, the calendar is without several major designers, including Ralph Lauren. He has been mum about when he plans to show his collection and finally revealed Thursday that he would host a “special show” for fall 2020 collection in New York in April.
While his spokesman declined to provide an exact date and location, he said the show is expected to take place in “late April.”
Lauren has been on the “see-now-buy-now schedule” since September 2016, and the fact that he’s showing the fall 2020 collection indicates that he is getting out of that rhythm and routine. Among New York designers who still do “see-now-buy-now” are Tommy Hilfiger (who is showing this season in London) and Rebecca Minkoff.
“Developing unique experiential shows continues to be a primary focus for the brand to engage consumers, maintain a series of freshness and add an element of surprise,” said the Ralph Lauren spokesman. “From the spectacular 50th anniversary show in Central Park to the launch of Ralph’s Café in the Madison Avenue flagship last year, followed by Ralph’s Club for ‘one-night only’ in September, the brand continues to create special and unforgettable experiences that bring the world of Ralph

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AG RTW Fall 2020

For the fall season, AG’s latest collection channeled Americana through vintage-inspired garb. 
“I like to use that word [vintage] loosely, because we take pieces and modernize it to what AG is,” explained John Rossell, the brand’s creative direction and digital marketing director. Throughout the collection, which featured men’s and women’s wear, sophisticated takes on more classic, rigid jeans felt of-the-now, and were layered with raglan Ts and workwear-inspired jackets. Standouts incorporated utilitarian details, like a brownish-red cropped trouser with cargo pockets, contrast stitching and tapered-out legs, or an elongated, belted denim jacket and beige leather-coated separates. To drive the Americana feel, a palette of “spiced rum” ran throughout the women’s ready-to-wear, while men’s offered moments of winter white within a more subdued, earthy palette.
WWD Critique: Overall, the brand presented a modernized vintage wardrobe through progressive cuts and interesting workwear details.
 
Read more reviews from WWD:
AG RTW Fall 2019
Staud RTW Spring 2020
Common Odds RTW Fall 2020
WATCH: NYFW Is Back on Top, Thanks to These Young Designers

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What’s Coming on the Fall Runways?

Ready, set, go.
As buyers, editors, influencers, designers, publicists, celebrities, stylists, makeup artists and just plain hangers-on (you know who you are) prep and steel themselves for the marathon of fashion shows ahead and ponder existential thoughts such as: “What should I wear every day to be sure I am photographed?” “Will I get a good seat?” “Where should we eat?” and “How can I be sustainable (or at least appear to be)?,” the most pressing question in advance of the hundreds of shows and presentations that will be held over the next month in New York, London, Milan and Paris is: What will fashion’s fall 2020 look like?
The answer? Pretty much what we’ve already seen.
The men’s wear shows in all of those cities, preceded and overlapped by the countless pre-fall women’s presentations and shows across the globe, have provided a clear roadmap of the fall trends that will be repeated, and amplified, on the runways over the next four weeks.
The key one is a new strain of minimalism exemplified by Daniel Lee’s Bottega Veneta with its subtly twisted take on clean silhouettes — not to mention highly desirable accessories that have become aspirational targets igniting a trickle-down effect felt across

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Elie Tahari RTW Fall 2020

Elie Tahari took a break from the runway for fall, preferring a private appointment and images to tell his story. The palette was lifted from the American artist Edward Hopper’s work, leaning on neutrals with deep-hued jewel tones layered in. Suits were more fitted with shoulder details, key outerwear pieces came in double-faced fabrics and buttery soft faux furs toppers. Vegan leathers were used throughout, on blouses with utility pockets, skirts and his trademark sheath dresses.
WWD Critique: Tahari’s step forward into eco-conscious fabrics underscores his ability to roll with the times and keep things fresh.

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Jamie-Lynn Sigler Explains Why She Will Not ”Fall Victim” to Her MS Diagnosis

Jamie-Lynn SiglerJamie-Lynn Sigler is refusing “to fall victim” to her MS diagnosis.
On Wednesday, The Sopranos alum stopped by Daily Pop and opened up about how she navigates being a working…

E! Online (US) – TV News

SPECIAL TIP UPDATE!

M Missoni Fall 2020

Pink’s Hot Dogs, open since 1939, may not be the newest, trendiest restaurant in Los Angeles. And that was the point, said Margherita Maccapani Missoni, who chose the oldie-but-goodie as the setting to show her third collection for M Missoni on Tuesday afternoon.
Upping the kitsch factor, models arrived via a Missoni-branded double-decker Starline, vamping off the Hollywood tour bus and onto the parking lot dance floor for a groove-off. Just a few blocks from some of the city’s most loved vintage stores, the setting suited the designer’s new strategy for the Missoni family diffusion brand, which has gone from missy to magpie bohemian since she took over as creative director last year and added upcycling to the story, showing her first collection in September on a trolley traversing the streets of Milan.
“The tour bus is a B side of L.A., not necessarily the cool side, same with Pink’s. I like that…” she said. “[M Missoni] is the B side of Missoni, everything here has a narrative in the past, whether it’s the stitch of a dress or the shape of a coat, but always twisted,” she added, sharing details of her own look as an example: a blanket jacket adapted

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NIHL Men’s Fall 2020

For his fall collection, Neil Grotzinger was inspired by queer coding in horror films such as “Psycho” and “Nightmare on Elm Street” — think Norman Bates with a touch of femininity. The result was a play on asymmetrical, deconstructed garments (mostly in leather) with a raw feel. The NIHL designer also used multiple tying techniques and nonfunctional zippers.
WWD Critique: Sure, the show had an entertainment factor, but the clothes seemed more suited for a Halloween party than real life.

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Lafayette 148 RTW Fall 2020

Following a recent re-branding, creative director Emily Smith reinvigorated Lafayette 148’s brand pillars with elements of surprise inspired by architecture and play on masculine/feminine. Rich leather offerings were standouts, including a matching brown button-down and trouser, and offered elegant ease when layered with cashmere knits, reversible coats and cool mineral-toned fur stoles. Unique logo details adorned an eight-knot cable knit sweater, as well as the new collection of footwear.
WWD Critique: Fall marked Lafayette 148’s strongest collection to date, offering up luxury appeal to a broader, younger audience.
 
Read more reviews from WWD:
Lafayette 148 RTW Spring 2020
Escada RTW Fall 2020
Common Odds RTW Fall 2020
WATCH: NYFW Is Back on Top, Thanks to These Young Designers

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Goodbye Streetwear: Paris Buyers’ Roundup Men’s Fall 2020

Paris was still gripped by ongoing pension strikes but the men’s fall 2020 collections did not stand still. From the “dreamy cloudscape” of Louis Vuitton to a reimagined Japanese restaurant for Doublet, via Ami’s Parisian scenery and Craig Green’s pristine white box, brands endeavored to take their audiences away despite constant gridlock and interrupted public transports.
“The public transportation strike has severely affected how we move around this city. It has greatly inhibited the amount of shows and showrooms I’m able to attend, forcing uncomfortable choices,” said Bruce Pask, men’s fashion director at Bergdorf Goodman and Neiman Marcus.
Nonetheless, the new suit and glamour emerged among the standout trends in the French capital, while sustainability and fluidity opened new creative vistas across the board. Buyers lauded the efforts of heavy-hitters like Kim Jones for Dior and Pierpaolo Piccioli at Valentino, while homegrown talents like Officine Générale or Casablanca stood alongside Londoner Craig Green, who showed for the first time in town.
Emmanuel de Bayser, co-owner of The Corner Berlin, said while in Paris, he focused on “strong, recognizable key show looks” and felt excited by the fact there was “a lot of creativity and some very good energy.”
As the calendar moves on to

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Courrèges RTW Fall 2020

Things are being reshuffled at Courrèges following the departure of creative director Yolanda Zobel at the beginning of the month, but some stayed pretty rooted: vinyl featured heavily for fall 2020, the designer’s last collection for the house, as did sustainability, an angle that Zobel strove to push at Courrèges.
In a collection inspired by images of French women from the Seventies, the label introduced a fresh version of its vinyl jacket, with a ballerina-like criss-cross front in a soft lilac hue. It was created in renewable polyurethane made from natural ingredients, coating an organic cotton base. Paired with dressy high-waisted trousers, the effect was sweetly ladylike. Graphic tights and body-con jerseys added a bit of fun to the dressed-up looks, while a yellow sponge sweater and sweatpant combination hinted at the house’s sports connection.
The outerwear was this collection’s strong point: a pale green cotton bomber jacket as well as a long belted dark brown trenchcoat were updated versions of house classics. It was a palatable, very much wearable collection, but it lacked the roughed-up touch that has become synonymous with Zobel’s tenure at Courrèges. It read as a direct translation of the house’s heritage, with a couple of staple pieces

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Fall Colors 2020: Pantone Says Experiment With Amberglow, Samba, Classic Blue and More

Permission granted.
That pretty much is Pantone’s message when it comes to experimenting with fall colors. The idea of trying out new hues or blending them with more traditional tones makes perfect sense in this time of genderless, seasonless, all-inclusive, collaborative, you-be-you fashion. An autumnal orange Amber Glow, fiery red Samba, down-to-earth Sandstone, tried-and-true Classic Blue and nearly neon Green Sheen took tops honors.
The top-ranked Amber Glow will be a welcome sight to Hermes’ board of directors, and Samba already got a global boost, thanks to Shakira’s Peter-Dundas designed ensemble during Sunday’s Super Bowl LIV Halftime Show.
But this time around rankings seem to be more of a footnote, with the emphasis being on a try-it-all mind-set.
Pantone’s Fashion Color Trend Report for New York Fashion Week fall 2020 still consists of 10 leading colors and four classic ones. The comfort-is-king factor doesn’t just cover ath-leisure and sneaker culture. Pantone Color Institute executive director Leatrice Eiseman wants consumers to feel at ease with a spectrum of colors.
She explained, “Rather than saying to them, ‘No, this is it — here are the five top colors — end of story.’ That is, I feel, far too dogmatic. I want them to reach out further than

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Trina Turk RTW Fall 2020

Inspired by style icons Ali MacGraw, Gena Rowlands and Mary Tyler Moore, Trina Turk’s latest collection had a Seventies bent with high-waisted trousers, gauchos, blazers, easy shirtdresses and pleated skirts in a variety of playful on-brand florals, stripes and checkered patterns. Leather and suede were standout fabrics, cut into a posh oxblood leather blazer, slick lipstick red bonded houndstooth trench and an olive green suede bomber that was juxtaposed against a bright, floral, clingy turtleneck. Multicolored houndstooth and wildly arranged florals were among eccentric suiting and event options shared across the women’s and Mr. Turk range.
WWD Critique: More city dweller than Palm Springs nomad for fall, Trina Turk brought a vacation sensibility into charming items that perfectly straddle a retro-modern line.
 
Read more reviews from WWD:
Trina Turk RTW Spring 2020
Escada RTW Fall 2020
Common Odds RTW Fall 2020
WATCH: NYFW Is Back on Top, Thanks to These Young Designers

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Brands to Check Out at the Fall Market in Vegas

PROJECT
Brooklyn Cloth
Founded in 2011, Brooklyn Cloth is the trend-driven apparel line under Icer Brands, the New York City-based parent company of labels such as Bklyn Athletics, The Narrows, Wayside, NBA licensed partner brand Unk, NFL by Icer Brands, and even Apple Bottoms, the denim line cofounded by rapper Nelly.
Brooklyn Cloth was born from the minds of Icer Brands’ owner Norman Jemal and Daron Jacob, head of creative, who witnessed the movement of trends in women’s wear and saw an opportunity to speak to those trends in men’s wear as well as through elevated fabrication, textiles and patterns.
“All of our fabrics have been elevated and have dimension to them. Today, the fabrics we make and use start from the yarn level,” said Jacob. “I’ve always loved the challenge of making things truly marketable that can touch many people, and cross over demographics, price points and distribution channels. Our lives are constantly evolving and we thought our brand will continue to evolve, as well.”

Brooklyn Cloth 
Courtesy Photo

Brooklyn Cloth gained notoriety from its jogger pant that retails for as low as $ 40 and complements T-shirts and tank tops that retail for between $ 18 and $ 20. It has also gained fans for its availability in

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Common Odds RTW Fall 2020

Designer Sue Jung’s latest collection continued the language of her spring range: covetable men’s wear-inspired essentials with minimalist and artistic undertones. She drew inspiration from artist Franz Kline, whose abstract black-and-white paintings inspired the darker color palette, which helped highlight cool design elements like the contrast stitching atop loosely cut button-downs and blazers with her signature cocoon sleeves. A darker palette also allowed Jung to focus on interesting fabrications, including a semisheer Japanese seersucker cut into a trucker shirt and vegan leather made into sleek separates. Surprisingly, the designer hadn’t ventured into tailoring until this season and, unsurprisingly, options like a side-tie black coat and trench with voluminous sleeves were impeccably made.
WWD Critique: Pieces express a quiet, sophisticated confidence and culturally resonant gender fluid approach to dressing, making Common Odds an exciting newcomer to keep an eye on.

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Escada RTW Fall 2020

For her first collection as global design director, Emma Cook sought to elevate fundamental Escada house codes — namely tailoring, where boardroom suits have become synonymous with the brand; cocktail dressing, and high ticket shearling, as an alternative to fur. Though Escada hasn’t been associated with modernity as of late, the fall range showed the promising beginning of Cook’s vision balancing sophistication with whimsy, which should appeal to both new and loyal customers alike.
“Just because the brand had its heyday in the Eighties doesn’t mean it should look like the Eighties,” Cook said of her game plan coming onboard, adding: “It was less about the archives and more about the values of the brand and what would that brand stand for today if Margaretha [Ley, the firm’s founding designer] was doing it today.”
With tailoring having its moment on the runway, it was wise of Cook to offer variety here without alienating the more conservative inclinations of returning customers. A head-to-toe logo jacquard suit was a playful standout, with other strong contenders featuring illusory double layers and gold cast buttons.
Gold hardware, in fact, was a common thread throughout, as buttons spelling out Escada accented a cozy and glamorous shearling coat, and

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Isabel Marant Étoile RTW Fall 2020

Everyone’s hankering after comfort these days — but the stylish kind — and Isabel Marant is right in there, with ponchos and alpaca sweaters, waving her fashion wand over gaucho classics, and pairing them with scrunched Eighties-style boots with sharp heels and toes. A sleek, leather puffer vest looked chic with wide, signature Marant shoulders and cinched at the waist; so, too, did the numerous options of high-waisted jeans that pouched in just the right places. She added length to a boiled wool workwear shirt in plaid, turning it into a new kind of overcoat.
WWD Critique: Marant has a knack for working style with a weather-worn flavor — here again, she mastered volumes with striking results.

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Ambush RTW Fall 2020

Fresh off its recent acquisition by New Guards Group, Ambush has big plans. Yoon Ahn, creative director of the brand she cofounded with her husband, Japanese hip-hop artist Verbal, said the first order of business was to streamline its 150 points of sale.
Next, she plans to add new categories to the label, which started out with jewelry but now makes 65 percent of its revenues from ready-to-wear. “Jewelry is always going to be a big part and the DNA of the brand,” she said. “I think we can definitely expand into shoes and bags so it becomes a full outfit.”
For her fall collection, inspired by the Japanese countryside, Ahn focused on layered silhouettes, with a beefed-up selection of knitwear and the introduction of the label’s first denim line. Layers of flimsy tops, kimono-collared jackets, raw-edged tailoring and padded coats gave the looks a lived-in feel.
Ahn said she was inspired by Jackie Nickerson’s “Farm,” a book of portraits of agricultural laborers in various African countries. Her jewelry also had a more grounded feel this season, with the introduction of natural stones alongside her signature padlock and chain designs.

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Gucci Men’s Fall 2020

Alessandro Michele is hearing bells — school bells — and answered their call with a kooky collection that took in school uniforms, little shorts and blazers, pastel coats shaped like art smocks and shiny metallic fabrics fit for the school disco.
He confessed an obsession with children’s clothing, tiny objects and a nostalgia for the innocence of childhood, a time when pretty much anything goes on the dressing up front and adults refrain from making judgments. “If a boy plays with his mother’s shoes when he’s five, or if he wears a magician’s hat to go to the park, nobody criticizes him, do they?” Michele told WWD, adding it’s a whole different story when a 50-year-old wants to wear the magician’s hat outside.
He’s absolutely right: Growing up isn’t easy, which is why he wanted this collection to be “a hymn to romanticism, and a hymn to men.”
Like so many Milanese designers this season, Michele wanted to examine traditional modes of male dress — and offer some alternatives. He sliced tailored jacket sleeves so they hit above the wrist, shortened trouser lengths and put grown men in school uniform shorts, like Prince George.
Michele tossed in a baby blue suit with knickerbockers that

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Rhude Men’s Fall 2020

For his first catwalk show on the official calendar in Paris, Rhuigi Villaseñor played to a packed house at the Elysée Montmartre concert hall, where guests including Miguel, Tyga, DJ Mustard and Bryson Tiller sat around a sand-covered catwalk inspired by a sumo wrestling ring.
Villaseñor dedicated the coed Rhude show, titled “Spirit of Ecstasy,” to his late grandfather, and opened it with a voiceover calling for environmental action, and a live performance by two taiko drummers. Though his show notes touched on Japanese samurai and festival culture, there was little trace of either in the show.
The men’s looks toggled between soft tailoring — think suits with protruding long pockets, or a belted robe coat — and sportswear staples with a twist: drop-crotched cargo pants, an asymmetrically buttoned olive varsity jacket, or a blue sweatshirt with off-kilter proportions.
The women’s outfits, meanwhile, ran the gamut from a chic black leather midi skirt to an oversize boiler suit. “I challenged the idea of luxury: what that is to the new kid, and what it is to the old tradition, and how I can meet that in the middle,” Villaseñor explained backstage.
The Los Angeles-based designer was less convincing on the sustainability angle, confessing that

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Han Kjobenhavn Men’s and Women’s Fall 2020

Reflecting on social interactions during dark Danish winters, Jannik Wikkelso Davidsen lined up an array of characters dressed in Eighties-inspired office wear in proportions that ranged from exaggerated boxy jackets and extra-tight pants to Nineties rave looks in acid tones. The contrast reached a literal peak with shirts and trenchcoats defined by sculpture-like structures on the shoulder.
WWD Critique: Behind the smoke of edgy performances and conceptual installations there were actually some commercially appealing pieces in Davidsen’s signature gritty aesthetics.

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Matchless London Men’s Fall 2020

This Italian outerwear brand is seeking a higher purpose, looking to make its jackets in a sustainable way, with materials such as corn fiber, and using algorithms during production to reduce energy and waste. The lineup featured a camo print shearling, lots of leather, biker styles and coats with hidden zippers and removable panels.
WWD Critique: Style wise, there was nothing particularly exciting here, but kudos to the team for coming up with solutions to the sustainability puzzle and for having the courage to make a tough-looking black jacket out of corn.

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