BØRNS Denies Sexual Harassment Allegations Following Flood of Claims on Social Media

Garrett Borns, known as indie rock artist BØRNS, is denying allegations of sexual misconduct, manipulation and harassment made by multiple young female fans. In tweets beginning Sept. 21, the women described meeting Borns at concerts — some when they were teenagers — which led to years-long conversations via Instagram and Snapchat messages that, according to the […]

Variety

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Women and Sexual Harassment: A Practical Guide to the Legal Protections of Title VII and the Hostile Environment Claim

Women and Sexual Harassment: A Practical Guide to the Legal Protections of Title VII and the Hostile Environment Claim


Here is a valuable guide that saves researchers investigating sexual harassment in the workplace enormous amounts of time and money. Focusing on the hostile environment claim under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Women and Sexual Harassment is a complete resource tool. In one easy-to-use volume, it provides a detailed background and history of the hostile environment claim as well as an extensive guide on how to use and where to find the best resources available on this topic. Unlike some legal books, Chan’s book does not require cover-to-cover reading to access pertinent information. Anyone, whether they are interested in the specifics of the hostile environment claim or sexual harassment in general, will be able to locate the information they’re looking for with the help of this handy guide. It saves enormous amounts of time, effort, and money for researchers by providing extensive listings and evaluations of statutes, cases, agency decisions, law review articles, annotations, and books containing information on this subject. Readers can use the book to get a better understanding of the hostile environment claim or use it like a dictionary to pinpoint the specific resources that will be most useful to their area of research. Women and Sexual Harassment is logically divided into five complete parts to make it easy to use: Part 1: Clearly explains how to best use the book to access specific information. Part 2: Describes the history and present state of the hostile environment claim in a manner that is to the point, yet is more thorough than descriptions of the claim found in articles, cases, or other sources. Part 3: Research guide-Directs researchers to the best sources for information, categorized by type and area. Includes tips that will save hours in the library and will help researchers find the most up-to-the-minute articles and cases. Part 4: Bibliography of primary legal sources-Covers statutes, regulations, and case law on the hostile environm

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Blogger Takes Off Her Makeup To Reveal The Ugly Truth About Online Harassment

 

You look disgusting.  

That’s the title of beauty blogger Em Ford’s latest YouTube video, a three-minute feature that’s about far more than lipstick and mascara.

 Ford, a 20-something from London who suffers from adult acne, has been posting photos of herself without makeup for the past three months. In the video, she washes off her makeup to highlight the disturbing online harassment she faces. She includes a smattering of the horrible comments she receives on social media daily, like “ugly,” “revolting,” and “I can’t even look at her.” 

She decided to share the video in an attempt to challenge societal preconceptions of beauty. 

“Over the past few months, I’ve received thousands of messages from people all over the world who suffer or have suffered from acne, an insecurity or self confidence issues,” she wrote on her blog, My Pale Skin. “I wanted to create a film that showed how social media can set unrealistic expectations on both women and men. One challenge many face today, is that as a society, we’re so used to seeing false images of perfection, and comparing ourselves to unrealistic beauty standards that It can be hard to remember the most important thing — You ARE beautiful.”

The video has racked up over 400,000 views since it was posted on Wednesday.  

 

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Sexual Harassment At Comic-Con Leads To Call For New Convention Policy

SAN DIEGO (AP) — Amid the costumes and fantasy of this weekend’s Comic-Con convention, a group of young women drew widespread attention to a very real issue — allegations of sexual harassment at the annual pop-culture festival.

Geeks for CONsent, founded by three women from Philadelphia, gathered nearly 2,600 signatures on an online petition supporting a formal anti-harassment policy at Comic-Con. Conventioneers told Geeks for CONsent they had been groped, followed and unwillingly photographed during the four-day confab.

Meanwhile, what Geeks for CONsent and others regarded as blatant objectification continued on the convention floor. Scantily clad women were still used as decoration for some presentations, and costumed women were described as “vaguely slutty” by panel moderator Craig Ferguson. When Dwayne Johnson made a surprise appearance to promote “Hercules,” 10 women in belly-baring outfits stood silently in front of the stage for no apparent reason.

Groping, cat-calling and other forms of sexual harassment are a larger social issue, not just a Comic-Con problem. And many comics and movies still portray women as damsels in distress. But Geeks for CONsent says things are amplified at the festival, where fantasy plays such a large role.

“It’s a separate, more specific issue within the convention space,” said Rochelle Keyhan, 29, director of Geeks for CONsent. “It’s very much connected (to the larger problem) and it’s the same phenomena, but manifesting a little more sexually vulgar in the comic space.”

“Comic-Con has an explicit Code of Conduct that addresses harassing and offensive behavior,” said Comic-Con International in a statement on Sunday to The Associated Press. “This Code of Conduct is made available online as well as on page two of the Events Guide that is given to each attendee.”

Earlier, Comic-Con spokesman David Glanzer told the Los Angeles Times that “anyone being made to feel uncomfortable at our show is obviously a concern for us.” He said additional security was in place this year, including an increased presence by San Diego Police.

Keyhan’s focus on Comic-Con began with a movement launched in her hometown called HollabackPhilly, to help end public harassment against women and members of the LGBT community. She and her colleagues developed a comic book on the subject in hopes of engaging middle- and high-school students, which is what brought them to Comic-Con.

Costuming, or cosplay, is a big part of the popular convention, with male and female fans dressing as their favorite characters, regardless of gender. A man might wear a Wonder Woman outfit, and a woman could dress as Wolverine. Keyhan and her colleagues — all in costume — carried signs and passed out temporary tattoos during the convention that read, “Cosplay does not equal consent.”

In addition to the existing Comic-Con’s Code of Conduct, Geeks for CONsent wants the 45-year-old convention to adopt a clearly stated policy and says staff members should to be trained to handle sexual harassment complaints.

“It makes it feel safer for the person being harassed to report it and also for bystanders who witness (inappropriate behavior),” Keyhan said.

Toni Darling, a 24-year-old model who was dressed as Wonder Woman on Saturday, said the issue goes way beyond Comic-Con.

“I don’t think it has anything to do with cosplay or anything to do with costumes,” she said. “People who are the kind of people who are going to take a photo of you when you’re not looking from behind are going to do that regardless, whether you’re in costume or not.”

Still, she’d like to see an advisory in the Comic-Con program against surreptitious photography, and a clearer statement from Geeks for CONsent. She found some fans were afraid to take photos, even when she was posing at a booth on the showroom floor.

“The kind of behavior that needs to be modified,” she said, “is somebody taking a photo of you bent over while you’re signing a print.”

___

Follow AP Entertainment Writer Sandy Cohen at www.twitter.com/APSandy .
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