Ermenegildo Zegna to Stage Spring 2020 Show at Former Industrial Complex

INDUSTRIAL VENUE: Alessandro Sartori has gotten attendees of his Ermenegildo Zegna shows accustomed to unexpected and often gargantuan locations.
For the upcoming spring 2020 show, the label’s artistic director has selected a former industrial complex, known as Area Ex Falck, located in Sesto San Giovanni on the outskirts of Milan. The show is scheduled at 8:30 p.m on June 14.
“This place allows me to continue to tell the story of incredible and unexpected venues in Milan through their essence. It’s a continuum: what a place meant in the past continues to live in the present and will continue to live in the future with a different soul,” Sartori told WWD.
The designer also teased the #usetheexisting dedicated show hashtag.
The show venue was home to Italy’s storied iron and steel company Falck, which was founded in 1906 and then converted in the Nineties to the production of energy from traditional and renewable sources. Dented by decreasing sales during the Seventies, the company dismissed the Sesto San Giovanni plants.
The original industrial site comprised five different plants called Unione, Concordia, Vulcano, Vittoria and Vittoria S, which covered 32 million square feet in the Sixties. The exact spot for the Ermenegildo Zegna show inside the area

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Billionaire Boy: Girls Aloud writers adapt David Walliams book for the stage

The songwriters behind Girls Aloud on adapting a children’s book for the stage.
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Stage Fright Gets the Best of Mikey

As Mikey prepares to open the biggest show of his life, his nerves start to get the best of him. Listen to him vent to his sister Dani.
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Star Wars’ Boyega heads for stage

Star Wars actor John Boyega is to play the lead in a new production of Woyzeck as part of the new season at The Old Vic.
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Prince Lionheart 2 Stage Seatsaver with Snack Tray, Grey

Prince Lionheart 2 Stage Seatsaver with Snack Tray, Grey


This seat saver has two stages that grow with your child. Its high-density foam construction prevents depression damage that is caused by car seats. The bottom tray keeps all car seats level and in proper position, and the kick plate protects upholstery from shoe scuffs. Works with all latch compatible car seat systems and fits all automobiles. Stage one, the bottom tray is used alone and works with all rear facing infant seats. Stage two, the back attaches to the bottom tray for use with forward facing toddler and booster seats. The Snack Tray provides a sturdy surface for travel treats and toys. Easy on/Easy off, Safe and easy to use. Use with car seats, booster seats, or strollers.

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Prince Lionheart 2 Stage Seatsaver with Backseat Organizer, Black

Prince Lionheart 2 Stage Seatsaver with Backseat Organizer, Black


2-Stage Seatsaver grows with your child. Protects your car’s upholstery. High-density foam construction prevents depression damage. Bottom tray keeps car seat level. Deep lip of bottom tray keeps Seatsaver in proper position. Kick plate protects upholstery from shoe scuffs. Fits all automobiles. Works with all latch compatible car seat systems. Comes with Backseat Organizer, a convenient place to store all the “stuff” a family needs while on the go. Well-made and durable with a lifetime guarantee.

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Tom Ford to Stage Show During London Collections: Men

FORD FORGES AHEAD: Tom Ford will unveil his fall 2016 men’s collection at London Collections: Men in January for the first time in a show format.
Ford, who usually holds appointments in his studio for press and buyers to view his men’s collections, has a provisional slot on the calendar for Jan. 11 at 6:30 p.m., and the British Fashion Council is set to confirm the final schedule on Dec. 7.
According to a Ford spokeswoman, a decision on how the collection will be presented has not been made at this time.
Ford, who did not stage a runway show or presentation for his women’s spring 2016 collection, took it to the small screen last month with a  video shot by Nick Knight that featured Lady Gaga.
Ford is working on his second film, “Nocturnal Animals,” an adaptation of the 1993 novel “Tony and Susan” by Austin Wright starring Amy Adams and Jake Gyllenhaal. The movie is due for release next year.

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Twin Pack Baby Bottle with Stage A Nipples- Orange 9 Ounces

Twin Pack Baby Bottle with Stage A Nipples- Orange 9 Ounces


Free of – Bisphenol-A (BPA), phthalates, nitrosamines, lead, PVC, PET, and biologically harmful chemicals.No Spill nipple features our cross cut design. The design also mimics natural breastfeeding as it requires your little one to nurse to receive fluid.Anti-colic nipple helps reduce incidence of gas and spit up. Unique one-piece design eliminates cleaning headaches and tricky assembly. No extra parts to lose.Extra soft, medical grade silicone – provides easier transition from breastfeeding to bottle feeding. Comes with Stage A nipple (for 0-6 months and marked with a number 2 on the nipple). Also available: Stage B nipple (for 6+ month and marked with a number 3 on the nipple).The transformational line – The thinkbaby system allows parents to transform baby bottles to our award winning Sippy Cup through purchase of the Conversion Kit. The system saves parents money and the environment from discarding baby bottles when it’s time for the next stage in feeding.Comes with Travel Top reduces chance of spillage during travel and protects the nipple from coming into contact with foreign substances.Dishwasher safe (Top rack recommended).Eco-friendly Baby bottles are made from materials that can be recycled after use. Does not leach chemicals to adversely affect the environment.
List Price: $ 11.31
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Carter’s Boys Stage 2 Shoes

Carter’s Boys Stage 2 Shoes


Carter’s every step is the new baby and toddler shoe line that is all about the natual stages of kids’ development – from crawling to running. Doctors say, Barefoot is best because it allows your child to naturally feel the ground and allows the foot to develop as nature intended. Our thinner, scientifically designed lightweight shoe protects little feet while enabling a like-barefoot sensation. Our unique technology stimulates your child’s natural senses without interfering with the ground surface or directing their natural development. Carter’s every step stages allow your child to grow and move the way nature intended. Start with Stage 1 Crawl is for babies who are crawling and exploring on their hands and knees. Wonderfully easy to get on and off even the squirmiest child, Stage 1 shoes provide protection for tiny toes – plus a roomy fit that allows children’s feet to develop naturally as they start to move and contact the ground independently. Stage 2 Stand is for toddlers who are pulling up and standing on their 2 feet. The Self Adjusting Fit (SAF) allows easy on and off for the busiest of toddlers and gives you the confidence of a perfect fit. Stage 2 is a lightweight and flexible shoe, allowing natural ground contact for your little one’s feet. Stage 3 Walk is for independent stride of bigger kids as they begin to work on their own. Stage 3 shoes feature the SAF system for this active stage, so you can rest assured that your child’s shoes are the perfect fit. Our thinner lightweight sole protects and is designed for growing kids-on-the-go. Made with PU and leather. Imported.

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Palais Galliera to Stage Countess Greffulhe Exhibit

FALL LADIES: While the Met preps for its “Jacqueline de Ribes: The Art of Style” exhibit, which will go on view at the Costume Institute’s Anna Wintour Costume Center on Nov. 19, the Palais Galliera is readying the first exhibit dedicated to the wardrobe of Élisabeth, Countess Greffulhe, from Nov. 7 to March 20, 2016.
Countess Greffulhe, who was Marcel Proust’s inspiration for the Duchess of Guermantes in his novel “In Search of Lost Time,” lived through the Belle Époque and the Roaring Twenties and was the acknowledged leader of the Paris social swirl for half a century. She became particularly influential after her marriage to the extremely wealthy Count Henry Greffulhe, raising funds, producing and promoting operas, sponsoring science, and dipping into politics.
Palais Galliera, a City of Paris museum, will display some 50 dresses from its collection bearing the labels of such couturiers as Worth, Fortuny, Babani, and Lanvin. There’s a tea gown with blue velvet on green silk designed by Charles Frederick Worth dating back to the turn of the century, a silver Babani coat from 1920, as well as other day dresses, evening dresses, indoor clothes, accessories, portraits, photographs and films.
The exhibition, curated by Olivier Saillard, the museum director, is to also shed light on

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Palais Galliera to Stage Countess Greffulhe Exhibit

FALL LADIES: While the Met preps for its “Jacqueline de Ribes: The Art of Style” exhibit, which will go on view at the Costume Institute’s Anna Wintour Costume Center on Nov. 19, the Palais Galliera is readying the first exhibit dedicated to the wardrobe of Élisabeth, Countess Greffulhe, from Nov. 7 to March 20, 2016.
Countess Greffulhe, who was Marcel Proust’s inspiration for the Duchess of Guermantes in his novel “In Search of Lost Time,” lived through the Belle Époque and the Roaring Twenties and was the acknowledged leader of the Paris social swirl for half a century. She became particularly influential after her marriage to the extremely wealthy Count Henry Greffulhe, raising funds, producing and promoting operas, sponsoring science, and dipping into politics.
Palais Galliera, a City of Paris museum, will display some 50 dresses from its collection bearing the labels of such couturiers as Worth, Fortuny, Babani, and Lanvin. There’s a tea gown with blue velvet on green silk designed by Charles Frederick Worth dating back to the turn of the century, a silver Babani coat from 1920, as well as other day dresses, evening dresses, indoor clothes, accessories, portraits, photographs and films.
The exhibition, curated by Olivier Saillard, the museum director, is to also shed light on

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Lemmy leaves stage with breathing issue

Motorhead should be riding high on the charts next week with their new album, Bad Magic, if their sales on Amazon are any indication
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Lemmy leaves stage with breathing issue

Motorhead should be riding high on the charts next week with their new album, Bad Magic, if their sales on Amazon are any indication
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This Is Not a Drill: Taylor Swift and Lisa Kudrow Sang “Smelly Cat” Together On Stage

The list of celebs who have not appeared on Taylor Swift's 1989 tour stage is now officially shorter than the list of those that have, and the additions she made during her final Staples Center…


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Hamlet on Stage

Hamlet on Stage


John Mills spotlights the various ways in which the role of Hamlet has been performed over almost four centuries. He launches this work with the first Hamlet portrayal, that of Richard Burbage, and then, in chronological order, describes and analyzes the Hamlets of the other actors who make up the great tradition of English-language Shakespeare acting. Mills devotes an entire chapter to each actor, focusing on acting style, text interpretation, theatrical and critical influences, popular and critical responses, and more. He offers a scene-by-scene account of the central figure’s performance, with special emphasis on business and line-readings.

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Stage Door: Three Days to See

2015-08-01-1438438921-9030130-ThreeDaystoSeecCarolRosegge1438313901364981x1024.jpgThe Miracle Worker, a young blind and deaf girl, awakened by her remarkable teacher Annie Sullivan. But Three Days To See, a new theater piece presented by Transport Group off-Broadway at Theater 79, introduces us to the adult Keller.

And she is extraordinary.

Seven actors speak her words — and Keller opines on everything from politics to literature. She wrote 14 books and met every president from Coolidge to Kennedy. A Radcliffe graduate, she fought tirelessly for equal treatment for the disabled and counted Mark Twain and Charlie Chaplin as friends.

Her story is hugely dramatic, yet Three Days is sometimes devoid of drama. That may be because director Jack Cummings III has chosen a presentational style — actors speaking to an audience — in fragmented moments.

The play is a mosaic, rather than a narrative, skipping back and forth in time. Born a healthy child in Alabama in 1880, a high fever at 18 months robbed Keller of her sight and hearing. Left in isolation, she was nearly feral until Sullivan rescued her from darkness.

The most recognizable moment in Three Days is Sullivan (Barbara Walsh) trying to feed Keller as a child. It’s a scene anyone familiar with “The Miracle Worker will recognize. This incarnation is choreographed to the Benny Goodman classic “Sing, Sing, Sing.” The music is wonderful, but its usage here is distracting.

Similarly, other scenes feature actors Ito Aghayere, Patrick Boll, Marc De La Cruz Theresa McCarthy, Chinaza Uche, Barbara Walsh and Zoe Wilson jumping on chairs, running around the stage or grabbing flowerpots. The text is powerful — it doesn’t always need physical distraction.

At the same time, Keller’s life is fascinating, and we’re moved and enlightened by her story. There are genuinely poignant moments here; one of the most memorable is when her beloved teacher Annie Sullivan dies.

The title Three Days is taken from a piece Keller wrote explaining what she would do if given three days of sight and sound.

While the musical choices either overwhelm or complement the action, featuring overtures from To Kill a Mockingbird to Gone With the Wind, there is power in Keller’s words. Three Days is a reminder of Keller’s amazing life. For those who did not know Keller’s full story, it’s an awakening.

Photo: Carol Rosegg

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The Vaccines join Mumford and Sons on stage

The Vaccines retuned to the stage after their earlier set to join forces with Mumford and Sons during their headline set at Poland’s Open’er Festival.
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Thinkbaby Baby Bottle With Stage A Nipple (0-6 Months) – Twin Pack – 9Oz

Thinkbaby Baby Bottle With Stage A Nipple (0-6 Months) – Twin Pack – 9Oz


When we introduced the thinkbaby over 4 years ago 95 of the baby bottles on the market were made of polycarbonate which contains BPA Initially we attempted to convince the major companies to move off of polycarbonate but after being unsuccessful we launched thinkbaby and thinksport to address the concern of chemicals leaching from consumer products We started with the baby bottle because polycarbonate was ubiquitous across the industry As little ones systems are still in a state of development they have very little defense against foreign chemicals While many companies have emerged to offer BPA Free baby bottles many bottles not only still contain BPA despite saying BPA Free but many companies have also landed on untested materials just because the material claims to be free of BPA thinkbaby utilizes the precautionary principle in the creation of all of our products We dont jump to new materials without doing the requisite testing to ensure that we havent landed on another BPAlike material When we target a product segment that concerns us we ask the question How can we make the product line Safe Functional Sustainable thinkbaby and thinksports focus has led us to be the first company to span safe consumer products ranging from baby to adultsProduct Features Free of BisphenolA BPA phthalates nitrosamines lead PVC PET and biologically harmful chemicals No Spill nipple Anticolic nipple helps reduce incidence of gas and spit up Extra soft medical grade silicone Stage A nipple for 06 months The thinkbaby system allows parents to transform baby bottles to our award winning Sippy Cup through purchase of the Conversion Kit The system saves parents money and the environment from discarding baby bottles when its time for the next stage in feeding Comes with Travel Top Dishwasher safe Top rack recommended Twin Pack 9 ozCountry of origin TaiwanSize 2PK9OZPack of 1Product Selling Unit Each

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Stage 2 Greek Yogurt Zucchini, Pear and Kale 3.50 Ounces (Case of 16)

Stage 2 Greek Yogurt Zucchini, Pear and Kale 3.50 Ounces (Case of 16)


Our Happy Baby Greek Yogurt pouches combine the gentle dairy goodness of Greek yogurt with fruits & veggies, for a nutritious pouch that will make little tummies happy.
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Baby Bottle with Stage A Nipple Orange 9 Ounces (0-6 Months)

Baby Bottle with Stage A Nipple Orange 9 Ounces (0-6 Months)


Free of Bisphenol-A (BPA), phthalates, nitrosamines, lead, PVC, PET, and biologically harmful chemicals. No Spill nipple features our cross cut design. The design also mimics natural breastfeeding as it requires your little one to nurse to receive fluid.Anti-colic nipple helps reduce incidence of gas and spit up. Unique one-piece design eliminates cleaning headaches and tricky assembly. No extra parts to lose.Extra soft, medical grade silicone – provides easier transition from breastfeeding to bottle feeding. Comes with Stage A nipple (for 0-6 months and marked with a number 2 on the nipple). The transformational line – The thinkbaby system allows parents to transform baby bottles to our award winning Sippy Cup through purchase of the Conversion Kit. The system saves parents money and the environment from discarding baby bottles when its time for the next stage in feeding.Comes with Travel Top reduces chance of spillage during travel and protects the nipple from coming into contact with foreign substances.Dishwasher safe (Top rack recommended).Eco-friendly Baby bottles are made from materials that can be recycled after use. Does not leach chemicals to adversely affect the environment.
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Stage Door: Nice Girl

2015-05-29-1432931806-6780920-ApH9cJWT4rHXiPPyreEABMtUCuGfsGGy5kKzK44qs.jpg

There’s a tiny hint of A Glass Menagerie in Nice Girl, the Labyrinth Theater’s latest production, now at the Bank Street Theater. Jo, 38, lives at home with her demanding yet clingy mother. Twenty years ago, she had a scholarship to Radcliffe and a bright future. But all that changed in the blink of an eye.

Neither the spiritually dead, but well-intentioned Jo (Diane Davis), nor her undercutting mother Francine (Kathryn Kates), are capable of separating from their symbiotic, soul-crushing union.

Nice Girl is set in suburban Boston in 1984, doesn’t rise to the poetry of Williams, but it possesses a poignancy and moving tribute to working-class blues that’s touching in its simplicity.

And its examination of internecine warfare is quietly heartbreaking.

Poor Jo. She’s so defeated by life and loneliness that when her coworker, a feisty relationship-plagued Sherry (Liv Rooth) asks her what she dreams about, she registers a blank look.

Playwright Melissa Ross is adept at home truths and finding the dark humor in characters wrapped in the stench of failure. She’s aided by director Mimi O’Donnell, who allows her cast to discover the emotional landmines present in simple flirtations or the possibility of joy.

The 70-seat theater seems the ideal forum for a production that explores the destructive impact of a dream deferred.

It’s only when Jo clicks with Donny, a former high school classmate (Nick Cordero), a local butcher, that she even entertains the possibility of change. Or is hope just another illusion?

The cast is letter-perfect. Davis’ shy smile and stoic demeanor speaks volumes, while Kate’s undercutting widowed mother has a strange chemistry with her daughter. They are trapped by more than mere circumstance. Similarly, Cordero and Rooth, both seasoned, eclectic performers, acquit themselves well.

Nice girls don’t finish first, but in Ross’ hands, they leave a lasting impression.

Photo: Monique Carboni

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自然香调 Bare Escentuals 双色眼影2.0 – The Big Debut (# Future # Center Stage) 3g/0.1oz

自然香调 Bare Escentuals 双色眼影2.0 – The Big Debut (# Future # Center Stage) 3g/0.1oz


分类:眼影 质地:柔滑细腻 上妆效果:极度丝滑和乳状质地,柔滑上妆,不易花妆。融入2种充满活力,相互融合的眼影色泽。色泽饱满,持久保持妆容。加入SeaNutritive Mineral TM成份。高效抗氧化因子,冷压紫草油,咖啡因和青瓜成份。带来抗衰老效果,减少面部浮肿和抗氧化功能。使眼周肌肤更加紧致柔软。
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The Edge takes a tumble off stage

U2 kicked off their Innocence + Experience world tour in Vancouver, Canada and he wasn’t without problems. The Edge fell off the stage during
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Stage Door: One Hand Clapping, Clinton the Musical

2015-05-16-1431805344-3138059-OneHand.jpgOne Hand Clapping, at 59E59 Theaters, is a thoughtful and engaging dark comedy.

Adapted and seamlessly directed by Lucia Cox from the novel by Anthony Burgess, of A Clockwork Orange fame, it kicks off the Brits Off-Broadway fest. Howard (Oliver Devoti) and Janet (Eve Burley) Shirley live a provincial existence. She works at a local supermarket and waxes rhapsodic over baked beans and toast; Howard, a used car salesman, is as negative as his wife is positive: “What are we, really? We don’t have much to give the world.”

Howard thinks it’s a wicked world, plagued by rampant consumerism and the threat of nuclear war. His one desire — to live like a millionaire for a month, then “to snuff it” — is admittedly novel. So is his tactic to secure a victory over circumstances. He decides to go on a quiz show, armed with a photographic mind and a relentless determination to win.

The fun is taking the journey with these two quirky people, the disciplined, exacting Howard, who, in Oliver Devoti’s hands is beautifully modulated and recognizable as a man painfully aware of his limitations. Similarly, Eve Burley is excellent as Janet, a simple, friendly woman who takes comfort in the ordinary, but yearns, however quietly, for something more. Plus, Meriel Pym’s set and costumes are spot-on.

A searing look at the changing mores of the ’60s, juxtaposed with the peppy black-and-white ads that run during the show. Advertising’s vapidness mirrors a post-war Britain aping American consumption. What happened, Howard muses, to the gravitas of earlier times?

At 80 minutes without an intermission, One Hand Clapping is an intimate, riveting ride. In this tiny theater, big things happen.

Crosstown, a larger off-Broadway venue takes on politics, always fertile ground for satire — and the Clinton years, with sex, scandal and Republican skullduggery, offered it up in buckets. So it’s probably no surprise that Clinton the Musical, now off-Broadway at New World Stages, has landed at the same time Hillary is running for president. 2015-05-16-1431805125-2264057-HuffPoClinton.jpg

It begins in 1993, when President Bill Clinton (Tom Galantich) takes office. He’s young, charismatic and Democratic, to the horror of GOP leaders, the food-obsessed Newt Gingrich (John Treacy Egan) and a gay, leather-loving Kenneth Starr (a joyously over-the-top Kevin Zak). They plot to unseat the new president by whatever means necessary — even if it means digging deeply into his Arkansas past and disrupting much need health-care reform.

What’s good public policy next to the obsession with power?

While the Republicans come in for their just slams, in a script that follows the roller-coaster ride that was Clinton’s impeachment, it also posits two Bills: WJ, the caring, responsible one, and Billy, the wild, womanizing playboy (Duke Lafoon). Only one person, an uber-ambitious Hillary (Kerry Butler) sees them both — at the same time!

And there in lies the conundrum of the Clinton years. Throw in a crazed Linda Tripp (Judy Gold) and a saucy Monica Lewinsky (a terrific Veronica J. Kuehn), and the fast-paced, over-the-top parody is complete. Paul Hodge’s score zings everyone, from the scandal-loving, fact-ignoring press to the right-wing conspiracy determined to take the president down at any cost.

One quibble: It’s too heavy-handed when driving home Hillary’s presidential ambitions. Men strive for the presidency with ferocity — and if you’re last name is Bush, blatant entitlement. Why not women?

Dan Knechtges’s direction is zippy and fun and his cast delivers. For political junkies, Clinton the Musical delivers all the wacky elements of power politics in red, white and blue.

One Hand Clapping photo: Emma Phillipson
Clinton the Musical photo: Russ Rowland

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Taylor Made RBZ Stage 2 Umbrella (White, 60 Single Canopy) Golf NEW

Taylor Made RBZ Stage 2 Umbrella (White, 60 Single Canopy) Golf NEW


60, single canopy manual open umbrella, Ergonomic sport-grip rubber-coated handle, Features clean and bold TaylorMade branding, matching sleeve included, 100% Nylon

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’80s Singer Tiffany Reveals What Could Have Been Her Stage Name And Why She Posed For ‘Playboy’ (VIDEO)

Only a handful of stars are well known by simply one name. Madonna. Prince. Cher. And, as fans of 1980s teen pop music would be quick to point out, Tiffany.

Three decades ago, Tiffany rose to fame with such hits as “Could’ve Been” and her famous cover of “I Think We’re Alone Now.” But long before the single-named celeb sold four million copies of her debut album, she was just 10-year-old Tiffany Darwish singing in bars in Nashville.

“I wasn’t really allowed to be there, so it was a quick little get-up-and-do-a-little-jam,” Tiffany tells “Oprah: Where Are They Now?” in the above video. “Nobody really wanted to give me a record deal. They were kind of like, ‘Come back when you’re older.'”

A few years later, Tiffany met George Tobin, who would become her producer, and her career as an artist was starting to take shape. The first order of business? Choosing her name.

“They were going to call me Tiffany Williams at first. My last name, Darwish… that’s just not acceptable!” she says with a laugh. “I kind of just said, ‘What about just Tiffany?'”

Then 15, Tiffany embarked on tour of shopping malls across America, where her sudden popularity soon created total chaos. “When it got to be bigger than life and people were actually being shoved against barricades and it wasn’t safe and we were actually being shut down, I actually started crying,” she says.

After her debut album hit No. 1 on the Billboard charts, Tiffany felt pressure to continue that momentum. “The next album, you’re rushed in the studio to re-record something and get it out there as soon as possible,” she explains. “It kind of lost some of its charm.”

She continued putting out albums, but never quite had the same commercial success as her initial release. Tiffany’s music career went through a few more ups and downs over the next several years. As she matured and evolved as an artist, Tiffany later became determined to shed the “teen queen” image that came with fame.

“I think I’ve always been put in a box, that I’m Tiffany, the girl from the mall tour,” she says. “Then I did Playboy.”

In 2002, Tiffany posed nude for the magazine, to the shock of many. But, as the 43-year-old wife and mother now explains, she had several clear reasons for doing it.

“I was actually going through a divorce — it rocks your world. It takes your confidence away,” she says. “[Posing for Playboy] was a quick confidence-booster. And, it was shock value.

“Everybody wants to talk to me,” Tiffany continues. “If I can turn that into music and go, ‘Yeah, remember that little thing I do…?’, it works.”

“Oprah: Where Are They Now?” airs Sundays at 9 p.m. ET, and returns with all-new episodes in February. Find OWN on your TV.

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TaylorMade RocketBallz Stage 2 Fairway (3HL-17deg)

TaylorMade RocketBallz Stage 2 Fairway (3HL-17deg)


The increased distance comes from a combination of improvements that includes an improved Speed Pocket design and a new, ultra-strong and ultra-fast clubface material called RocketSteel that we developed in cooperation with Carpenter, a company renowned for expertise in creating high-performance metals. RBZ Stage 2 fairway woods also feature a low-profile head shape with a shallower clubface and lower CG location that makes it incredibly easy to launch the ball off the turf on a high and long-carrying flight. The white, glare-resistant crown features a unique black, yellow and gray decal designed to help you frame the ball opposite the center of the face, and easier to detect exactly how the clubhead is aimed to give you confidence that the face is aligned exactly the way you want it before you start your takeaway. TaylorMade RocketBallz Stage 2 Fairway Features: Ultra-high strength TaylorMade RocketSteel supplied by Carpenter creates a thinner and faster-flexing fa
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Stage Door: Not the Messiah (He’s a Very Naughty Boy)

2014-12-18-NottheMessiah.jpg

For Monty Python fans, Eric Idle is a wacky kind of genius.

A co-creator of Monty Python on TV and film, he also wrote the book and lyrics for the Tony-winning Spamalot, which ran nearly five years on Broadway. Inspired by his success, Idle turned to another Python favorite, The Life of Brian. Teamed with composer John Du Prez, the duo transformed it into a comic oratorio, aptly dubbed Not The Messiah (He’s a Very Naughty Boy).

Operating on all cylinders, it recently blew Carnegie Hall audiences away.

It was performed by Idle, alongside several Broadway vets: Tony-winner Victoria Clark, Marc Kudish, Lauren Worsham and artist William Ferguson, who recently joined the Metropolitan Opera. Accompanied by the wonderful Collegiate Chorale, and a team of bagpipers, they made comic magic. The Chorale, which is noted for its eclectic repertoire — traditional to obscure works — is a key addition to any musical work. So is the Orchestra of St. Luke’s, which regularly collaborates with Carnegie Hall.

First performed in 2007 in Caramoor Center for Music and Arts in Westchester, New York, a time Idle refers to as “the halcyon days of the Bush Administration,” Not The Messiah boasts irreverent humor and an amazing score. The musical numbers rely on a range of genres — pop to gospel, country to classical.

The oratorio is based on “The Book of Brian,” the story of a young Judean during Roman rule. He is the wrong man, in the wrong place, at the wrong time. Inexplicably, despite Brian Cohen’s protestations, he is mistaken for the Messiah. As history has made clear, that’s never a happy ending.

When Brian admonishes followers not to look to him, but have faith in themselves, he exclaims: “You’re all individuals!” They chorus: “We’re all individuals!” One of the best examples of mob-think ever. Throw in Python references to the dead parrot sketch, lumberjacks and hysterical songs like “We Love Sheep,” “What Have The Romans Ever Done For Us,” “Mrs. Betty Parkinson” and “The People’s Front of Judea” and the irreverence reaches its zenith.

Idle calls Not the Messiah “baroque-n-roll.” Audiences just call it terrific. If you missed the live show, take heart. It’s available on iTunes, Flixster and Netflix.
Arts – The Huffington Post
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Stage Door: The River, It’s Only A Play

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Hugh Jackman is a big Broadway draw. Even though his current drama The River at Circle in the Square drowns in insignificance. Ticket prices exceed the most expensive musical; it’s a lot to pay to watch Wolverine gut a fish, though no one can dispute the man does it with finesse.

Despite the considerable talents of the song-and-dance performer, what you get is 85 minutes of a rambling, nonlinear story of a fisherman (an understated Jackman) who brings various girlfriends (Cush Jumbo and Laura Donnelly) to his rustic cabin. The women, like his dialogue, are interchangeable. There, he feigns romance — or does he? — while waxing poetic about fly-fishing.

There’s no hint of menace, though the various women suggest the hunky fisherman regularly casts his reel — but can’t haul in an emotional commitment. He’s got a trick to catching fish; and he uses similar wiles to lure lovers.

Given his celebrity status, Jackman can choose from any number of scripts to showcase his considerable range. The mystery is why he tapped this one. Jez Butterworth brought his convoluted, over-the-top rant Jerusalem to Broadway a few years ago. The River, his latest UK import, is less energetic, but equally confusing and unsatisfying.

At one point, Jackman likens the sensation of catching sea trout to “a million sunsets rolled into a ball and shot straight into your veins.” If only The River had that much splash.

Happily, It’s Only A Play does. It is an acerbic love letter to the theater — and no one can outdo Terrence McNally when it comes to delicious digs. In a snappy comedy now at the Gerald Schoenfeld, he sends up Broadway producers, directors and actors, zinging their narcissism and self-obsession with targeted glee.

McNally has updated his 1986 comedy — savaging everything from celebrity-larded shows — “theater is the new Statue of Liberty for movie actors” — to Matilda to New York Times reviews. The vicissitudes of the theater and its habitués are rendered with a series of sassy one-liners, delivered at super-sonic speed. Nothing escapes McNally’s wrath.

The play opens in the elegant Upper East Side bedroom of a silly blonde producer (Megan Mullally) awaiting reviews of her first production, The Golden Egg. Nathan Lane plays a TV actor who turned down the lead; he secretly hopes his playwright/friend’s (Matthew Broderick) work is a flop. A pitch-perfect Stockard Channing is Virginia Noyes, a one-time star hoping Egg secures her much-needed comeback. She drips with venom, sashaying across the set with righteous indignation. Like the irrepressible Lane, she is one of the show’s high points.

Throw in Rupert Grint, of Harry Potter fame, making a solid Broadway debut as a kleptomaniac wunderkind director, F. Murray Abraham as a vitriolic critic and a wonderful Micah Stock as the naive coat-check boy, and It’s Only A Play promises a hugely entertaining romp.

The only crack in this Egg is Broderick, whose monotone whines are grating. Whatever the line, it’s rendered in a wimpy, nasal drone.

Fortunately, the terrifically funny cast, led by the always-cheeky Lane and tightly directed by Jack O’Brien, more than compensates. For anyone who loves theater and all its crazy trappings, this Play is for you.

Photo: Richard Termine
Arts – The Huffington Post
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‘Duck Dynasty’ Musical Headed For Las Vegas Stage

Duck Dynasty” is making the leap from the small screen to the stage, with reports that a musical based on the controversial family is headed to Las Vegas.

The musical, from the production company behind “Jersey Boys,” will be a semi-biographical show based on Willie and Korie Robertson’s book, “The Duck Commander Family: How Faith, Family, and Ducks Built a Dynasty,” The Hollywood Reporter said.

The show will not star the Robertson family, but instead feature actors playing members of the family, the website reported.

The New York Times says the 90-minute, 14-song show will likely open in February at The Rio, which is currently home to Penn & Teller’s live show as well as a Chippendales performance.

I think the expectation is that it’ll be all chicken-pickin’ stuff and banjos, but what we’re trying to do is pull out as much heart, humor and sincerity as we can to keep people surprised,” Steven Morris, one of the show’s composers, told the newspaper.

The Times also reports that anti-gay remarks from family patriarch Phil Robertson will be addressed in the show.

In an interview with GQ last year, Phil Robertson compared homosexuality to bestiality and said African-Americans were happy before the civil rights era.

Robertson later issued an apology, but has continued to make controversial remarks. In June, he claimed he was “trying to help those poor souls and turn them to Jesus” and in September said he’s as much of a homophobe as Jesus. He has also claimed that AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases are God’s “penalty” for immoral conduct.

“The Robertsons are so unusual, their story so juicy, and theater shouldn’t be limited to telling stories about people you resemble or revere,” producer Michael David, who said he was personally offended by the comments, told the Times.

Season 7 of “Duck Dynasty” premieres next week on A&E.
Arts – The Huffington Post
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Theater: Jane Austen On Stage? Bedlam Ensues!

THE SEAGULL *** out of ****
SENSE & SENSIBILITY *** 1/2 out of ****
BEDLAM AT THE SHEEN CENTER

Others — led of course by the New York Times — have acclaimed Bedlam as a theatrical company of exceptional quality. See their latest productions of Chekhov’s The Seagull and a new adaptation of Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility done in repertory and you’ll immediately know why. They’re a strong ensemble with versatile actors and a keen intelligence devoted to the pure theater extolled by Cheek By Jowl and others right up the recent Peter and The Starcatcher. It’s theater that exults in the marriage of their talents and your imagination to create something special that needs no elaborate sets or frippery. The Chekhov is good (no small feat). The Austen is delightful and near masterful. And I will be certain to see whatever they do next.

You know the stories. In The Seagull, a famed actress heads to the country for a rest, only to have her petulant son Konstantin throw a fit when she giggles at his “play” and her lover — a writer who, she believes, should be thrilled to have her — grows besotted with a much younger ingenue. Meanwhile, the son is the object of affection for Masha, a woman he cannot see while she in turn is stalked by an obdurately dull school teacher named Medvedenko who makes less than $ 2000 a year and has no source of conversation other than the injustice of such a thing. It does not end well.

In Sense and Sensibility, the Dashwood women are thrown onto hard times by a weak-willed half-brother and his viperish wife. The willful younger sister Marianne is admired by the sober and deeply worthy Colonel Brandon but has her head turned by the dashing and feckless John Willoughby. The reserved and appealing older sister Elinor forms a deep attachment to the modest and equally reserved Edward Ferrars. But all seems to conspire against them and they are so careful of their emotions you despair of them even beginning a courtship much less consummating one. It ends very well because of course this is Austen. Her greatness lies in making the happy ending not inevitable but real and wholly earned.

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Both plays begin and end with a dance. Ending with a dance is an Elizabethan tradition carried on by the Globe in London and it’s a delightful one. In The Seagull, it feels a bit random and beside the point, though not a bother. In Sense & Sensibility, it is integrated more wholly into the show: the cast dances around in modern dress and then slowly disrobes their outer garments to reveal period dress as their dance reverts from modern free-for-all to the more formal style of Austen’s era.

Indeed, many of the directorial flourishes in Seagull feel a little unnecessary. The Russian play features a dramatic set change from act one to act two. In act one we are watching via stadium seating as the mostly outdoor scenes are performed. In act two, we move to a semi-circular seating around the action that is much more intimate and involving. While the staging would have been trickier, you only wish the whole show had been done that way because it’s so well-suited to the work. Jarringly, the young would-be playwright Konstantin (played by the director Ken Tucker) pops up in a silly red devil costume that feels more low-brow Will Ferrell than witty.

But these are minor concerns since most of the actors are spot-on and immediately involving. Vaishnavi Sharma is wonderful as the self-involved star, making her more human and less indifferent than I’ve seen before without ever underplaying her self-regard. Jason O’Connell is equally compelling as the writer Trigorin. The scene where she opens herself to him and we see the vain actress slip away and the insecure woman of a certain age remains is very moving. Up and down the cast holds our attention, from the doctor (Nigel Gore) right down to Masha, the daughter of the estate’s manager who is forlornly in love with Konstantin. She’s played by Andrus Nichols, who was so compelling that when my guest and I wondered who might play the lead in Sense we both hoped it would be her (and had our hopes confirmed). Even the often ponderous teacher Medvedenko is played by Samantha Steinmetz with wonderfully droll comic timing worthy of Ellen Degeneres at her best.

The weak links unfortunately are Tucker as Konstantin and Laura Baranik as the aspiring actress Nina who is wooed and destroyed by the writer Trigorin. Partially, it’s casting. We accept Steinmetz as a male teacher but somehow Tucker’s size and age make it hard to see him as the son of Sharma. And Baranik isn’t quite up to the devastation of Nina. This means the final scene where Tucker and Baranik survey their shattered lives falls somewhat flat. But a solid Seagull is no mean feat and the flat comic flourishes felt like minor missteps. Both of these actors fare much better in Sense & Sensibility.

Indeed, almost everyone fares much better in Sense and Sensibility. The set design is immediately promising: it includes elaborate floor to ceiling window panels on wheels that can be moved around to create a wall or separate areas or pulled back to frame a scene and allow outsiders to peer in on the action like the busybodies that pepper Austen’s novels. Another key feature are chairs on wheels. While Tucker clearly did very good work with the actors on Seagull, his every directorial intention is superbly successful in Sense & Sensibility. The audience lines the walls on two sides with the action taking place in the middle. He’s aided at every stage by the scenic design of John McDermott, the costumes of Angela Huff, the lighting of Les Dickert and especially the choreography of Alexandra Beller.

The show begins with the dance I described. Then the actors launch into a babble of conversation, each of them addressing audience members with the currency of the times: gossip. Those simple white chairs on wheels prove wonderfully versatile. During a dinner party, the actors are arrayed around the space a large table would occupy. But when one character begins to timidly offer a tidbit of social news, others swoop in like sharks smelling blood; they herd her off into a corner, forcing every vital drop of news from her lips. At other times, when say Elinor hears distressing news, her chair is wheeled around and around across the large rectangular stage in dizzying dismay. A carriage ride is handled deftly and amusingly without straining for laughs. A scene of two young women chatting with superficial politeness is staged like a duel, with each of them at opposite ends of the stage on their little white chairs, like gunfighters facing off on the main street of a town. A dozen other moments are handled with similar ingenuity and cleverness.

The boisterous and essentially harmless if overwhelming Mrs. Jennings is an ideal fit for Tucker, who here uses his imposing size to marvelous effect without ever stopping to caricature. If anything, she’s more delightfully menacing than a figure of fun. When the Dashwood women meet her and their other relations, Tucker simply has them bark out howls to indicate the pack of dogs that follow them everywhere, a neatly disorienting effect that is hilarious and slightly unnerving at the same time as you almost look here and there for the animals that seem to have invaded the stage.

And the cast rises to the occasion of Austen’s brilliant novel and this excellent adaptation by Kate Hamill (who plays the passionate Marianne). Gore is very good as the Doctor in Seagull but he’s even better as the moving Colonel Brandon. His monologue detailing the dastardly life of John Willoughby may be the show’s emotional high point. Similarly, John Russell is fine as the prickly estate manager in Seagull but really good as both the dashing Willoughby and the spineless half-brother of our heroines. (One scene where he enthusiastically greets his sisters sans wife is a bit split personality; perhaps he should seem a tad more apologetic in his enthusiastic greeting? Otherwise, his work is impeccable.)

I can go up and down the line. Thanks to Tucker’s inventive but always emotionally motivated direction and staging, the actors shine. Steinmetz scores again in two wonderfully opposite turns as Mrs. Dashwood and the silly Anne Steele. Baranik fares much better as the villains Fanny Dashwood and Lucy Steele than she did as Nina; nastiness suits her. Andrus Nichols fulfills my expectations as the intelligent and sensible — almost too sensible — Elinor. Jason O’Connell is sweetly tentative as Edward Ferrars and his scenes with Elinor are brimming with unspoken affection. Sharma — the best thing in Seagull — is strong as the littlest Dashwood, a role that might easily have been played too broadly and for laughs.

But here the playwright modestly lets herself down. The willful Marianne is not an easy role and while Hamill shines as adaptor, she is fine but not exceptional as that impetuous young woman who must maintain our sympathy while being an utter dolt, not to mention emotionally imploding at various key moments.

One can sense director Tucker’s leanings towards broad humor leading him astray in Seagull. That tendency is in check most of the time in Sense. When an intended betrothal enrages the Ferrars, the scene where they pile on in a fit of indignation worthy of a rugby scrum works well because it’s a bit of gossip being related to a third party. The exaggeration is amusing. If it were the actual scene unfolding, the staging would be ludicrous and out of sorts with the tone of the show.

Unfortunately, that pratfall instinct overwhelms the finale. Elinor and Edward are finally meeting, finally free to declare their love. She’s just had the supreme disappointment of misunderstanding that Edward has married another. He gently, diffidently, tentatively, sweetly clears up the confusion…and she runs screaming from the room. This moment of slapstick tragically robs us of one of the great passages of understated passion in any work of art.

So this Sense and Sensibility gets the humor and certainly the gossipy, unforgiving world of high society to a “t.” Its staging is — with that glaring exception — impeccable and truly inventive. It’s worthy of a much longer run on a bigger stage and it ranks as one of the best shows of the year. But it does not move you nearly as much as the novel does and a great adaptation should. Still, it’s only a few tweaks and — my apologies to the excellent adaptor — perhaps a switch in casting away.

Already, it ranks as perhaps the greatest stage adaptation of this novel in history. That’s not as high praise as it should be since I slowly realized how very rarely Jane Austen has actually been adapted to the stage at least on Broadway and as far as I can tell the West End. Even though her novels are marvels of dialogue and character and brimming with plot, they have almost never made it onto the boards, despite an endless stream of versions on TV and at the movies. It’s certainly the first time I’ve seen a stage production of any of her work. Here and there a musical version is attempted, but even that rarely. Austen’s sightings on Broadway are rare to the point of bemusement. A stage adaptation of Pride & Prejudice ran for six months beginning in 1935 (and was turned into the marvelous 1940 film starring Laurence Olivier). In 1959, a musical spin on Pride & Prejudice ran for just over two months. And that’s it. What can possibly explain it?

It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single novel in possession of a good plot must be in want of an adaptation. Finally, Sense & Sensibility has received a theatrical one worthy of it.

THEATER OF 2014

Beautiful: The Carole King Musical ***
Rodney King ***
Hard Times ** 1/2
Rosencrantz And Guildenstern Are Dead **
I Could Say More *
The Loneliness Of The Long Distance Runner **
Machinal ***
Outside Mullingar ***
A Man’s A Man * 1/2
The Tribute Artist ** 1/2
Transport **
Prince Igor at the Met **
The Bridges Of Madison County ** 1/2
Kung Fu (at Signature) **
Stage Kiss ***
Satchmo At The Waldorf ***
Antony and Cleopatra at the Public **
All The Way ** 1/2
The Open House (Will Eno at Signature) ** 1/2
Wozzeck (at Met w Deborah Voigt and Thomas Hampson and Simon O’Neill)
Hand To God ***
Tales From Red Vienna **
Appropriate (at Signature) *
Rocky * 1/2
Aladdin ***
Mothers And Sons **
Les Miserables *** 1/2
Breathing Time * 1/2
Cirque Du Soleil’s Amaluna * 1/2
Heathers The Musical * 1/2
Red Velvet, at St. Ann’s Warehouse ***
Broadway By The Year 1940-1964 *** 1/2
A Second Chance **
Guys And Dolls *** 1/2
If/Then * 1/2
The Threepenny Opera * 1/2
A Raisin In The Sun *** 1/2
The Heir Apparent *** 1/2
The Realistic Joneses ***
Lady Day At Emerson’s Bar & Grill ***
The Library **
South Pacific ** 1/2
Violet ***
Bullets Over Broadway **
Of Mice And Men **
The World Is Round ***
Your Mother’s Copy Of The Kama Sutra **
Hedwig and the Angry Inch ***
The Cripple Of Inishmaan ***
The Great Immensity * 1/2
Casa Valentina ** 1/2
Act One **
Inventing Mary Martin **
Cabaret ***
An Octoroon *** 1/2
Forbidden Broadway Comes Out Swinging ***
Here Lies Love *** 1/2
6th Annual August Wilson Monologue Competition
Sea Marks * 1/2
A Time-Traveler’s Trip To Niagara * 1/2
Selected Shorts: Neil Gaiman ***
Too Much Sun * 1/2
Broadway By The Year 1965-1989 ***
In The Park **
The Essential Straight & Narrow ** 1/2
Much Ado About Nothing ***
When We Were Young And Unafraid
Savion Glover’s Om **
Broadway By The Year 1990-2014 ***
The Lion ***
Holler If Ya Hear Me * 1/2
The Ambassador Revue ** 1/2
Dubliners: A Quartet ***
The National High School Musical Theater Awards *** 1/2
Wayra — Fuerza Bruta * 1/2
Strictly Dishonorable *** 1/2 out of ****
Between Riverside And Crazy ***
The Wayside Motor Inn ***
Bootycandy ***
Mighty Real ***
This Is Our Youth ***
Rock Bottom * 1/2
Almost Home * 1/2
Rococo Rouge **
Love Letters ** 1/2
The Money Shot ** 1/2
The Old Man and the Old Moon *** 1/2
You Can’t Take It With You * 1/2 out of ****
Can-Can at Papermill ** 1/2
The Country House ** 1/2
Cinderella ** 1/2
Shakespeare’s Sonnets at BAM (Rufus Wainwright, Robert Wilson) ***
When January Feels Like Summer ** 1/2
It’s Only A Play ***
The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time *** 1/2
Found **
Generations ** 1/2
On The Town **
The Belle Of Amherst **
The Fortress Of Solitude *** 1/2
When Father Comes Home From The Wars Parts 1, 2 & 3 *** 1/2
Disgraced **
The Real Thing ** 1/2
The Last Ship ***
Ghost Quartet *** 1/2
Show Boat ***
Sticks and Bones **
The Seagull by Bedlam ***
Sense and Sensibility by Bedlam *** 1/2
Saturday Night/Musicals In Mufti ***

_____________

Thanks for reading. Michael Giltz is the founder and CEO of the forthcoming website BookFilter, a book lover’s best friend. It’s a website that lets you browse for books online the way you do in a physical bookstore, provides comprehensive info on new releases every week in every category and offers passionate personal recommendations every step of the way. It’s like a fall book preview or holiday gift guide — but every week in every category. He’s also the cohost of Showbiz Sandbox, a weekly pop culture podcast that reveals the industry take on entertainment news of the day and features top journalists and opinion makers as guests. It’s available for free on iTunes. Visit Michael Giltz at his website and his daily blog. Download his podcast of celebrity interviews and his radio show, also called Popsurfing and also available for free on iTunes.

Note: Michael Giltz is provided with free tickets to shows with the understanding that he will be writing a review. All productions are in New York City unless otherwise indicated.
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Stage Door: Wiesenthal

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Known as the “Jewish James Bond,” Simon Wiesenthal is credited with bringing 1,100 Nazis war criminals to justice, including a role in the capture of Adolph Eichmann, the architect of The Final Solution. The survivor of numerous concentration camps was adamant in his commitment to speak for the 6 million dead Jews.

He refused to quit — even when he and his family were threatened.

As portrayed by Tom Dugan, the writer and star of the riveting one-man show Wiesenthal, off-Broadway at the Acorn Theater, Weisenthal did not fight for vengeance but justice. In addition to Jewish Holocaust victims, he also spoke for the murdered Soviets, Poles, Gypsies, homosexuals and Jehovah’s Witnesses.

The former architect was relentless in his refusal to be sidelined by bureaucratic indifference, the Cold War and ongoing anti-Semitism. His life’s work was a promise to the 6 million: “I did not forget you.”

Persistence and passion were his guiding stars. But far from a lecture on the Holocaust, Wiesenthal is a remarkable platform to present a compassionate man who understood that statistics blur horror; individual stories demand our attention.

In the guise of welcoming a group of Americans to his office on his retirement day, the 95-year begins his remembrance. With humor, an occasional joke, a hopeful note and a recount of cruelty “beyond the power of imagination,” we learn about his life, coming to respect and admire the heroic Wiesenthal.

Just after the war, he cofounded The Jewish Historical Documentation Center in Linz, Austria, to gather information and testimony for future war crimes and help refugees locate lost relatives. Per Wiesenthal, Austrians killed half of all Jewish victims, though Austria was loath to prosecute its war criminals or address its national role in the Holocaust.

He moved the center to Vienna in 1961, just down the street from members of Eichmann’s family, waiting for any nugget of information that could deliver Adolph Eichmann to justice.

Rather than track Nazis himself, Wiesenthal meticulously pieced together data and information from a vast network of friends, colleagues and sympathizers, including German war veterans, appalled by what they had witnessed.

Wiesenthal understood that though the Nazis lost the war, their ideology, like their freedom, remained. He was also instrumental in destroying the much-used argument “I was just following orders,” citing two German officers who refused to carry out death sentences. Blind obedience to authority is vicious, he reminds us. We have choices. And he chose to stay and fight.

High on Wiesenthal’s most-wanted list was Franz Stangl, the commandant of the Treblinka and Sobibor concentration camps in Poland. Located in Brazil, Stangl was sent to West Germany for imprisonment in 1967. He also aided in the capture of Franz Murer, “The Butcher of Wilno” and Erich Rajakowitsch, in charge of the death transports in Holland. Another high-priority case was Karl Silberbauer, the Gestapo officer who arrested Anne Frank. Dutch neo-Nazis were discrediting the authenticity of her diary until Wiesenthal located Silberbauer, then a police inspector in Austria, in 1963, who confessed to her capture.

Wiesenthal wrote several books on his exploits, including The Murderers Among Us and Every Day Remembrance Day.

Dugan’s 90-minute play is heartfelt, deeply moving and compelling; he makes history come alive. The 53-year-old actor nails Wiesenthal’s Austrian dialect, elderly mannerisms and mischievous charm. His extraordinary performance pays tribute to one man’s lifelong crusade for justice and tolerance. Wiesenthal should be required viewing for all.

Photo: Carol Rosegg
Arts – The Huffington Post
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Stage Door: Uncle Vanya

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Life in Czarist Russia at the turn of the 20th century is bleak. The general malaise infects eco-forward Dr. Astrov, estate manager Vanya and his niece Sonya, while the serfs have little expectation of relief. Russia may be two decades away from the Bolshevik Revolution, but Uncle Vanya, now off-Broadway at the Pearl Theatre, offers a glimpse of a country on the verge of a nervous breakdown.

Like Ibsen, Chekhov is a key figure in the birth of modernism in the theater, albeit with a distinctly Russian sense of foreboding. The doctor, in the guise of the playwright, bemoans: “The climate is changing for the worse, every day the planet gets poorer and uglier.”

Charting the misery of his beloved Russia on the brink is Chekhov’s artistry. He is adept at heartbreak, exposing the raw yearnings of those caught between desire and obligation. Broken people, broken relationships destroyed by inertia and indifference are his specialty.

Uncle Vanya is set on an estate populated by a sterile, controlling academic, his disappointed young wife and overworked relations. While Vanya isn’t as dramatically tense as Chekhov’s Three Sisters or The Seagull, it is prescient in tone. Replete with literary giants — Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy, Pushkin and Gogol — Russia lagged behind burgeoning democratic movements worldwide. The play addresses women’s rights, power imbalances and ecological issues, though Russia has yet to be roused from its tyrannical slumber.

In Uncle Vanya, only two characters, a bloviated, dry academic (Dominic Cuskern) and his wife Yelena (Rachel Botchan), the object of desire for both Vanya and Dr. Astrov (Bradford Cover), have a scintilla of ease. In turn, Astrov has bewitched Sonya (Michelle Beck).

Vanya and Sonya run the family estate, sacrificing their own needs to send earnings to her father, the pompous professor. His arrival signals the realization of profound unhappiness; their routine subverted, their misery increases exponentially. Is it too late to repair?

Paul Schmidt’s translation is unerringly modern, the word “freak” is repeatedly used, as is the directorial style. But the strife and longing of the Russian soul is ever-present. The catch — Vanya is more depression than drama. The painting that hangs on the wall in act two is telling — a ship on rough waters threatens to capsize. Yet the need to sail on, whatever the hardships, remains.

Chekhov’s larger vision is evident in Astrov’s desire to preserve the forests for future generations, one of the more notable aspects of this ensemble production. However, not all the performers are in sync. Cover plays Astrov as a tormented whiner, circa 2014, while Botchan, usually a key part of any Pearl production, is uneven. Beck’s Sonya is respectable, and Mixon’s Vanya is a convincing wreck. The directorial balance is tricky; and the lack of action is a decided handicap. But kudos to set designer Jason Simms and Barbara A. Bell’s costumes for hitting the right note.

Uncle Vanya is a challenge to stage. Still, as a chronicle of fin de siècle family dysfunction, wasted lives and thwarted passions, Chekhov’s analytic eye sees all.

Photo by: Al Foote III
Arts – The Huffington Post
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TaylorMade RBZ Stage 2 Cadet Triton Golf Glove

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Carter’s Girls Pink Embroidered Heart Stage 1 Shoes

Carter’s Girls Pink Embroidered Heart Stage 1 Shoes


Carter’s every step is the new baby and toddler shoe line that is all about the natual stages of kids’ development – from crawling to running. Doctors say, Barefoot is best because it allows your child to naturally feel the ground and allows the foot to develop as nature intended. Our thinner, scientifically designed lightweight shoe protects little feet while enabling a like-barefoot sensation. Our unique technology stimulates your child’s natural senses without interfering with the ground surface or directing their natural development. Carter’s every step stages allow your child to grow and move the way nature intended. Start with Stage 1 Crawl is for babies who are crawling and exploring on their hands and knees. Wonderfully easy to get on and off even the squirmiest child, Stage 1 shoes provide protection for tiny toes – plus a roomy fit that allows children’s feet to develop naturally as they start to move and contact the ground independently. Stage 2 Stand is for toddlers who are pulling up and standing on their 2 feet. The Self Adjusting Fit (SAF) allows easy on and off for the busiest of toddlers and gives you the confidence of a perfect fit. Stage 2 is a lightweight and flexible shoe, allowing natural ground contact for your little one’s feet. Stage 3 Walk is for independent stride of bigger kids as they begin to work on their own. Stage 3 shoes feature the SAF system for this active stage, so you can rest assured that your child’s shoes are the perfect fit. Our thinner lightweight sole protects and is designed for growing kids-on-the-go. Made with PU and Leather. Imported.

Price: $
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Carter’s Boys Stage 2 Shoes

Carter’s Boys Stage 2 Shoes


Carter’s every step is the new baby and toddler shoe line that is all about the natual stages of kids’ development – from crawling to running. Doctors say, Barefoot is best because it allows your child to naturally feel the ground and allows the foot to develop as nature intended. Our thinner, scientifically designed lightweight shoe protects little feet while enabling a like-barefoot sensation. Our unique technology stimulates your child’s natural senses without interfering with the ground surface or directing their natural development. Carter’s every step stages allow your child to grow and move the way nature intended. Start with Stage 1 Crawl is for babies who are crawling and exploring on their hands and knees. Wonderfully easy to get on and off even the squirmiest child, Stage 1 shoes provide protection for tiny toes – plus a roomy fit that allows children’s feet to develop naturally as they start to move and contact the ground independently. Stage 2 Stand is for toddlers who are pulling up and standing on their 2 feet. The Self Adjusting Fit (SAF) allows easy on and off for the busiest of toddlers and gives you the confidence of a perfect fit. Stage 2 is a lightweight and flexible shoe, allowing natural ground contact for your little one’s feet. Stage 3 Walk is for independent stride of bigger kids as they begin to work on their own. Stage 3 shoes feature the SAF system for this active stage, so you can rest assured that your child’s shoes are the perfect fit. Our thinner lightweight sole protects and is designed for growing kids-on-the-go. Made with PU and leather. Imported.

Price: $
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Stage Door: ‘Drop Dead Perfect’

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With a nod to the films Rebecca and Mildred Pierce, not to mention a sly reference to The Glass Menagerie, entertaining camp has scored again. Drop Dead Perfect by Erasmus Fenn, starring downtown actor Everett Quinton, is a clever send-up of movie queens and 1950s’ melodrama.

Now at the Theater at St. Clement’s, Drop Dead Perfect is fast-paced and funny. Set in 1952, Quinton plays Idris Seabright, an eccentric matron of a Key West estate, whose ward Vivien (a terrific Jason Edward Cook) and Cuban nephew Ricardo (Jason Cruz), double as the Lucy and Ricky of Florida.

Vivien, the victim of an overbearing Idris, has artistic ambitions, while Ricardo, a hot Latin boy with his own agenda, stirs up the household in unforeseen ways.

Idris, a rather demented grand dame, given to quoting her deceased sea captain father’s off-the-wall remarks — “I know how many beans make five!” — is forever changing her sizable will. Obsessed with stillness, she wreaks havoc on loved ones, while hiding various family scandals and secrets.

The tale, narrated by Michael Keyloun, has a wonderfully overheated quality, thanks to a strong ensemble and Joe Brancato’s lively direction. Paying homage to the outrageousness of Charles Ludlam’s Ridiculous Theatrical Company, Drop Dead Perfect parodies pop culture from the ’40s to the ’60s with a keen eye and tongue-in-cheek naughtiness.

First done at the charming Penguin Rep Theatre in Stony Point, NY, the production utilizes Quinton’s gift for oversized performances as he channels Joan Crawford, joined by a sexy Cruz, versatile Cook and even-keeled Keyloun. Sound designer William Neal’s love of Laura-themed music, coupled with a perfect set by James J. Fenton, ensures the comedy clicks.

Drop Dead Perfect is delicious summer fare.

Photo: Ed McCarthy
Arts – The Huffington Post
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Stage Door: Gertrude The Cry

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Shakespeare’s Hamlet has inspired many variations – the latest is Howard Barker’s Gertrude: The Cry, part of the Potomac Theatre Project at the off-Broadway Atlantic Theater Company.

Barker has used the backdrop of Hamlet — the affair between his mother, Queen Gertrude (Pamela J. Gray), and uncle Claudius (Robert Emmet Lunney), to explain the story’s deadly consequences. The overarching thrust is Gertrude’s carnality; the sexual desire between her and Claudius is so intense, it inevitably transforms lust into murder.

Unlike the traditional image of her tormented son Hamlet (David Barlow), this round he’s strangely unemotional about his father’s death. The playwright has turned him into a semi-humorous adolescent moralist, or in his mother’s words, “a prude.” He is repulsed by Gertrude’s cry, the ecstatic pleasure shrieks, servant Cascan (Alex Draper) explains, that will drive her to great dangers – no matter the consequences.

Such interpretations fit into the “theatre of catastrophe” theory Barker uses to describe his work, which he believes should give the audience a sense of dislocation, underscoring his larger point: Art isn’t digestible.

Here, Barker relies heavily on Gertrude’s severe sensuality (which Gray plays expertly) — and her passion consumes all of act one. However, a disjointed second act goes into overdrive — murderous plots, ruminations on sex and death and the sensual appetites of Albert, Duke of Mecklenberg (Bill Army) for the Queen. The problem is that Gertrude, despite respectable performances, is long-winded; the changes to the actual tale are a bit half-baked.

Unlike his excellent Scenes From an Execution, aided by the multitalented Jan Maxwell, Gertrude is confusing. Sex may be a powerful, primal stimulant, but it doesn’t achieve the salvation — in whatever form — that Barker seems to claim for his characters. Nor does the direction, which despite solid cast performances, appears more collegiate than compelling.

Photo: Stan Barouh
Arts – The Huffington Post
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Stage Door: Bullets Over Broadway, Violet, Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill

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Is art worth killing for?

Woody Allen’s new Broadway musical Bullets Over Broadway, an entertaining romp, thinks so. Based on his 1994 movie, with zippy direction by Susan Stroman, the musical comedy is fun. It’s not quite the over-the-top craziness, with a dash of smarts, that made the film so memorable, but it’s close.

Now at the St James, Bullets Over Broadway is splashy, rather than electric, thanks to sensational costumes and sets — save the one of Greenwich Village, which is oddly misconceived. But as traditional musicals go, it mostly works — with a proviso. Set in 1929, it’s a musical without an original score. Glen Kelly, who adapted the period music, including great numbers like “Running Wild” and “Tiger Rag,” played perfectly by the Atta-Girls, terrific singers and dancers who capture the Roaring Twenties.

The story is strictly screwball: David (Zach Branff), an earnest playwright, finally gets a shot on Broadway. The hitch is that his debut will be financed by a single backer, gangster Nick Valenti (Vincent Pastore), who brings a caveat of his own. Make his dopey girlfriend Olive (Helene Yorke) a star. That’s a tall order, especially since the show has enlisted legendary diva Helen Sinclair (Marin Mazzie) has ideas of her own.

Throw in the critically artistic eye of Cheech (Nick Cordero), the heavy assigned to keep an eye on Olive, and Bullets Over Broadway shifts into high gear. Everyone in the cast, including Betsy Wolfe as David’s girlfriend and Yorke as the goofy gun moll turned wannabe actress, hit their mark. Mazzie is convincing in her role, while Branff, making his Broadway debut, could use a few more sparks. Still, the crew’s general silliness clicks.

Cordero’s Cheech is a high point; it’s hard not to enjoy the kooky world that Stroman/Allen have created. Woody Allen, who wrote the book, economized on some of the film’s strengths, but the production still boasts good, old-fashioned showmanship.

By contrast, Violet, now at the American Airlines Theater, is a more intimate musical. The soulful country-style band sits backstage; the actors are downstage. Brian Crawley’s book, adapted from Doris Betts’ short story The Ugliest Pilgrim, is a sad tale of an adult’s quest for beauty as redemption.

Tony winner Sutton Foster stars as Violet, a young Southerner disfigured at 13. Early on, she refers to the “axe blade” that “split my face in two.” Desperate to be cured, she embarks on a bus trip from North Carolina to Oklahoma. There, she hopes to be transformed by a popular televangelist (Ben Davis), who makes outrageous healing claims.

The trip, which begins in a Nashville bus station in 1964, is meant as a journey of discovery. Stopping in Memphis, she meets two soldiers, a cocky white man named Monty (Colin Donnell) and a more sensitive black man called Flick (a moving Joshua Henry), who knows what it’s like to be judged by appearance. The trio bond, but the catch, and it’s a big one, is Violet doesn’t get her revelation.

Flick provides the reveal — that love is the only salvation — weakening the dramatic structure. Despite a genuine poignancy — Violet’s back story is told in scenes with her father (Alexander Gemignani) and a younger version of herself (a terrific Emerson Steele) — the play has moments of disconnect. Yet the raw humanity, especially in the segregated South, is touching.

The performances are strong, and Sutton Foster skillfully tackles both musical and dramatic moments. But even with Jeanine Tesori’s tender score, more exposition would add greater coherence.

Happily, Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill, a memoir turned musical at Circle in the Square, may not be more hopeful, but it strikes the right chord. Set in a Philadelphia club in 1959, a few short months before the great Billie Holiday died, it stars Audra McDonald. She brilliantly channels the legendary jazz singer — her inflections, charisma and misery. McDonald captures Holiday at the end of her life: broken but still capable of moving an audience. 2014-04-20-HuffPoLadyDaycopy.jpg

Lanie Robertson’s play is thin, but she pays respect to both the pathos and the grit of this jazz phenomenon. Stumbling and drinking, Holiday relates the traumatizing moments of her life, including being raped at 10, how her first and “worst love,” Sonny Monroe, got her hooked on heroin, and her relationship with saxophonist Lester Young, who dubbed her Lady Day, and her mother, “The Dutchess.” She recounts teaming with Artie Shaw; among the first black women to work with a white orchestra.

Numbers such as “God Bless the Child,” “What a Little Moonlight Can Do,” “Strange Fruit” and “T’ain’t Nobody’s Business If I Do” showcase Holiday’s essence — a proud artist ill-treated by abusive men and a racist America.

Smoothly directed by Lonny Price, this is a solo show, though McDonald is backed by an excellent jazz trio — Sheldon Becton on piano, George Farmer on bass and Clayton Craddock on drums. Billie Holiday’s life was tragic; yet as McDonald hypnotically illustrates, she has left us her singular artistry.

Bullets Over Broadway photo: Paul Kolnik; Lady Day photo: Evgenia Eliseeva
Arts – The Huffington Post
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On Stage Kiss Helmer Rebecca Taichman

Through the years, I have had many discussions with people about directors. A director’s work is often tricky to review on the basis of one production — in the case of a first work, it is often unclear what is a director’s idea versus what is a stage direction in the script itself. It is also hard for people to separate actors’ choices from a director’s touch. But after a period of watching a director’s work, you get it. You know how good that director is. And I think Rebecca Taichman is very good.

The first production of hers I saw was Theresa Rebeck’s The Scene at Second Stage Theatre. While the play may have fallen apart a little, the production featured great performances (particularly by a then virtually unknown Anna Camp) and perfect staging. I have since seen many productions she has helmed, including Kirsten Greenidge’s Milk Like Sugar (Playwrights Horizons), Greenidge’s Luck of the Irish (LCT3), Sarah Ruhl’s Orlando (Classic Stage Company), Dark Sisters with music by Nico Muhly and libretto by Stephen Karam (MTG/Gotham Chamber Opera at John Jay College), David Adjmi’s Marie Antoinette (Soho Rep.) and, most recently, Ruhl’s Stage Kiss (Playwrights again). Out of all of these titles, I only didn’t like her work on Marie Antionette. But, then, I don’t know why anyone thought staging a scaled down Marie Antionette was a good idea. I do not blame Taichman; I didn’t get any of it, from the script on.

Generally Taichman’s work is characterized by a unique understanding of the proper tone for a given piece. She doesn’t make her productions overly glib or cynical; she tailors her work to the material, as a director should. If you are in New York, this is the last week to catch Taichman’s impeccably breezy work on Stage Kiss. If you are in San Diego, you can see her production of J.B. Priestley’s drama Time and the Conways at the Old Globe. (The play, which Taichman described as “extraordinary,” is a staple in the UK, but is rarely done in the US.)

In a recent conversation with me, Taichman stated she enjoys directing comedy and drama equally. “One of the gifts I’ve been given, is that my work can span genres and across different tones and styles,” Taichman said. “I can do new plays, opera and Shakespeare. I find they all feed each other. I love doing a lot of different kinds of work.”

Stage Kiss, which received mostly positive reviews, marks Taichman’s fourth time staging a work by Ruhl. “I love working with Sarah,” explained Taichman. “I feel we sort of share a dream space somehow. The type of epic, surreal questions she is asking are the questions that dog me. I love her sense of theatricality. I love how she mashes up the everyday and infuses it with a mystique.”

Taichman will reunite with Ruhl this fall for the world premiere of The Oldest Boy at Lincoln Center’s Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater. Taichman said the play is about Buddhism and is more similar to the world Ruhl presented in Eurydice than it is to Stage Kiss.

Taichman is also gearing up to direct Familiar by Danai Gurira (who co-wrote and starred in In the Continuum off-Broadway and is well-known for playing Michonne on the AMC drama series The Walking Dead), scheduled to run at Yale Repertory Theatre from January 30 through February 21, 2015. From that it is onto Rehearsing Vengeance, a play she has been developing with Paula Vogel for years. Rehearsing Vengeance, based on the life of the play God of Vengeance, will premiere at La Jolla Playhouse summer 2015. I also hope one day to see GrooveLily’s Sleeping Beauty Wakes, which Taichman is working on with the band. I missed my opportunity before, but am holding out hope.

For now though, Taichman is all about seeing Time and the Conways through previews and bidding adieu to Stage Kiss. There are only eight performances left for you to go laugh at Stage Kiss.

“There is a particular delight in hearing audience laughter,” she said. “There is a particular joy in bringing laughter into people’s lives.”
Arts – The Huffington Post
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Aisle View: Sex, Live on Stage

“NOTICE: THIS PLAY CONTAINS NUDITY, SEX & BAD LANGUAGE,” says a bold-lettered, red-bordered sign in the box office lobby at Intimacy, the new offering from the New Group at New York City’s Acorn Theatre, running through March 8. The language, as it turns out, is not all that out of line by today’s standards. But bad playwriting? Yes.

Thomas Bradshaw, whose Burning was presented by this same company in this same space two winters ago, picks up where he left off — which is to say with sex slathered across the stage. In this case, there are bodily fluids spurting through the air. Yes, bodily fluids. And that’s just in the first 20 minutes. One of the teenaged girl actors uses said fluid to help control her acne. There is also a toilet bowl on stage, which gets used. You can only sit there and wonder whether there are limits to what some actors will do to get — and keep — a role.

Bradshaw sets his play in a wealthy suburb in what seems to be California. Four horny neighbors live in three houses with three horny teenagers, which provides the author with all sorts of combinations. The plot evolves when the straight-laced father of one of the families discovers photos of the neighbor’s daughter in a skin mag. (What was he doing with that magazine, anyway?) His son, who is the most over-exposed character in the play (and I only hope the actor’s mother doesn’t come see it), decides to direct a porn movie starring the girl and his father, who is suddenly not so straight-laced anymore. The girl’s parents, meanwhile, have anal sex while watching their daughter in a porn movie; it’s that kind of play. The audience, meanwhile, gets to see the anal sex on a big-screen TV, in full color. Oh, and Bradshaw makes use of Goodnight Moon in a manner that the publishers of that childhood staple would probably not be too happy about.

As for those poor actors, they do what they are told, and I hope they get enough union workweeks for health coverage. The names will be withheld, in hopes that they quickly rebound. There are at least three of them whom I would like to see more of — that is, less of — in future dramatic endeavors. We can say that Intimacy is directed by Scott Elliott, who also directed Burning and — as artistic director of the New Group — presumably picked this new play on purpose.

There was a time when we used to get plays laced with dirty words, with the authors purposely trying to shake up the audiences to allow their messages to get through; David Mamet did this, and effectively so. Bradshaw does something of the sort with sex acts, rather than cuss words, but from my seat it seems more gratuitous than purposeful. He also throws in a distinct amount of gratuitous bigotry, in a manner hinting that it is not the characters who are bigoted but maybe the author. Or perhaps he has a dramatic purpose, which in this case doesn’t reach across the footlights.

Intimacy is the sort of play that could make you nostalgic for simulated sex scenes. Supporters of hard-core porn repeatedly exclaim that if people don’t want to see this stuff, no one is forcing them to get a ticket; nobody has to see Intimacy. Expect long-suffering drama critics, that is.
Arts – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Adults Playland today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Cambridge Primary Mathematics Stage 6 Games Book + Cd-rom

Cambridge Primary Mathematics Stage 6 Games Book + Cd-rom


Cambridge Primary Mathematics Stage 6 Games Book + Cd-rom

Price: $
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